Review: Much Ado About Nothing

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Much Ado About Nothing Review
3 of 5 stars to William Shakespeare‘s play Much Ado About Nothing. We read this play in my 9th or 10th grade English course as a comparison to his more popular plays such as Macbeth, Othello, Romeo & Juliet and Hamlet, as well as something different from his historical fiction plays about various kings and queens. It was an opportunity to see his brilliance in writing something different and basically… about nothing. Well not really nothing, but you get the drift.

It was a decent play. And I can say that because I’ve read over 40 of his plays. It’s not like I just picked a few up and said “Eh, it’s decent,” not having read enough to know. It’s Shakespeare of course. Everyone loves/hates him, depending basically on whether you like this sort of thing or you do not. And scholars can argue for hours about what it all meant, who really wrote it, what was being hidden in the lines and characters. But for me… this was just a normal play.

Given I tend to like very character-driven stories or complex plots, this one doesn’t rank very high on my scale for what I’ve read. Yes, the plot is fairly low-key… some romance, some issues between couples… it didn’t have a tremendous amount of magic for me… say as something like “As You Like It” or “Twelfth Night.” Those were memorable characters whom you rooted for despite all odds.

It’s very strong in terms of language, innuendo, imagery and balance. But as far as a leisurely and enjoyable read, I didn’t take a whole lot from it. Of course, all English majors should read it. But if you want some light re-exposure to Shakespeare, I wouldn’t recommend this one as a starting place.

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For those new to me or my reviews… here’s the scoop: I read A LOT. I write A LOT. And now I blog A LOT. First the book review goes on Goodreads, and then I send it on over to my WordPress blog at https://thisismytruthnow.com, where you’ll also find TV & Film reviews, the revealing and introspective 365 Daily Challenge and lots of blogging about places I’ve visited all over the world. And you can find all my social media profiles to get the details on the who/what/when/where and my pictures. Leave a comment and let me know what you think. Vote in the poll and ratings. Thanks for stopping by. Note: All written content is my original creation and copyrighted to me, but the graphics and images were linked from other sites and belong to them. Many thanks to their original creators.

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11 thoughts on “Review: Much Ado About Nothing

    Emma's Library said:
    May 2, 2017 at 1:43 PM

    I had this as one of my AS English Lit plays and I had to compare it to Othello, talking about disguise and deception. It has been a while since I read it but this was always my favourite next to Twelfth Night and A Midsummer Night’s Dream. I think when it comes to Shakespeare, I prefer his comedies over his tragedies!

    Liked by 1 person

    BrizzleLass said:
    May 2, 2017 at 3:09 PM

    I’m one of those extremely odd people who has read all of Shakespeare’s plays over the years, I’ve also seen a fair few of them on the stage. This is definitely one of the weaker ones for me. I always preferred his tragedies, Macbeth and King Lear being my favourite.

    Liked by 1 person

      James J. Cudney IV responded:
      May 2, 2017 at 3:10 PM

      It’s fantastic you’ve seen them all. I’ve caught a few on Broadway, but mostly seen several on TV. Read about 40… but want to take on a few more in the coming years. Macbeth is in my top 3.

      Liked by 1 person

    Kester (from LILbooKlovers) said:
    May 2, 2017 at 6:19 PM

    Ha, I’m actually reading Macbeth right now! The movie makes everything make sense… Reading it through is like “whoa I don’t know what’s going on!”

    Liked by 1 person

    Quentin said:
    May 5, 2017 at 5:40 AM

    […] Much Ado About Nothing (1598) […]

    Liked by 1 person

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