Review: King Lear

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King Lear Book Review
3 of 5 stars to King Lear, a tragic play by William Shakespeare, published in 1603. I enjoyed the play and then watched a few film versions. My review will cover both the book and the film I saw — with a bit of sarcasm and humor (just to be different than all the other ones! LOL)

Lear is an absolutely ridiculous character who belongs in the looney bin in my opinion. He has lost all control over his life, his family, and his kingdom. He is foolish, blind, and stubborn. When reading the play, I thought Lear was some old king who couldn’t take care of anything. He was just plain ineffective. After watching a few film versions, I whole heartedly agree. Lear is still a vain, crotchety old man. However, I did see some humor in him that I didn’t notice in the first reading of the play. He was definitely not likable on a first read; however, when I started to watch the video clips, I found myself saying that I could tolerate him. All of a sudden, I classified him as likable human. Even when you just want to kill him, he is still kind of funny and tolerable.

Lear was somewhat like a grandfather in my opinion. Not one of those everyday grandfathers though. He reminded me of the much older, funny grandfather who laughs at everything, but doesn’t realize what he’s doing. In fact, I actually thought of him as a Santa Claus figure. It sounds weird, but the looks automatically qualify him to be Santa Claus. His attitude could be a problem though. He might have been a really nice guy when he was younger and not so stubborn. As for Lear’s daughters… I see Lear’s daughters as all being from 25 to 40 – no more than that, though. Gonerill though did make Lear’s anger appear believable to me. I see how much she had to say and then I realize how he can be so upset with Cordelia’s response. Cordelia seems a little too weak to be his daughter. I picture her as being stronger and able to handle herself against him. It was hard to picture three daughters surrounding their old, aging father Lear. Having each daughter one by one go to their father to say how they loved him was powerful. I watched the characters grow and then leap off the page.

The play is a good one to read, to see the life of parents and children, royalty and order of succession. It’s a great commentary on how we behave and treat our elders, especially both as parents and as humans. And on the flip side, you also see what happens when you make rash decisions, not realizing the impact down the line… and how much you want to fix them, but sometimes you cannot.

About Me
For those new to me or my reviews… here’s the scoop: I read A LOT. I write A LOT. And now I blog A LOT. First the book review goes on Goodreads, and then I send it on over to my WordPress blog at https://thisismytruthnow.com, where you’ll also find TV & Film reviews, the revealing and introspective 365 Daily Challenge and lots of blogging about places I’ve visited all over the world. And you can find all my social media profiles to get the details on the who/what/when/where and my pictures. Leave a comment and let me know what you think. Vote in the poll and ratings. Thanks for stopping by. Note: All written content is my original creation and copyrighted to me, but the graphics and images were linked from other sites and belong to them. Many thanks to their original creators.

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8 thoughts on “Review: King Lear

    Cate said:
    May 19, 2017 at 2:55 PM

    I won’t lie, I really didn’t like reading King Lear. It’s just wasn’t the play for me. There was SO much drama. I just couldn’t deal. I like Shakespeare’s writing itself- and I do enjoy is sonnets- but I think there’s just too much drama. I also read Romeo and Juliet and thought the same thing.

    Like

      James J. Cudney IV responded:
      May 19, 2017 at 2:57 PM

      Lear wasn’t my favorite either… I enjoyed it more after I watched 2 film versions, but it still wasn’t an ideal match. R&J is definitely major hype. I preferred Twelfth Night and a MidSummer Night’s Dream.

      Liked by 1 person

        Cate said:
        May 19, 2017 at 3:55 PM

        Yeah, I didn’t read it by choice, it was for a lass. I’ve seen the Ian McKellan Lear adaption and it made it a little more bearable.

        Liked by 1 person

        James J. Cudney IV responded:
        May 19, 2017 at 3:56 PM

        I’ve not seen that one yet, but do like most of his films and shows. Read his biography a few years ago, too.

        Liked by 1 person

        Cate said:
        May 19, 2017 at 4:05 PM

        Yes, he’s quite the good actor. (And it just adds to it that the Lord of the Rings are great movies.) Was it any good? There’s actually an interview he did around the time when that Lear adaptation was released wit him talking about Lear’s character. It gives you a new insight if you have the chance to watch it. It’s on Youtube.

        Liked by 1 person

        James J. Cudney IV responded:
        May 19, 2017 at 4:09 PM

        I will definitely take a look at that clip, if it’s there. The book was good. A bit short, but I think I may have done a review on it here on the site somewhere. I just re-watched his SNL episode the other night. He played Maggie Smith. Hilarious!

        Liked by 1 person

        Cate said:
        May 19, 2017 at 4:21 PM

        Do! Haha, I must check that out! I love watching SNL although I have to watch it online because we don’t have the channel for it here.

        Liked by 1 person

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