Review: Julius Caesar

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Julius Caesar Book Review

In 1599, William Shakespeare published his famous tragic play, Julius Caesar. In this tragedy, he explores the effect of power and trust across many characters, those who have it and those who are hungry for it. Several memorable lines originate in this play, offering guidance on how to go about building a network of friends and an army of enemies. Most readers are familiar with the story of vengeance and betrayal when it comes to Julius Caeser, and this is the central theme in Shakespeare’s play. How do you know when you can truly trust someone? What happens when hearsay changes someone’s mind? Who do you turn to when you’ve been betrayed by someone you thought was trustworthy. These are persistent motifs across literature for hundreds of years. As one of the original literary works focusing on it, this classic has set a high standard for using one’s words versus using your physical prowess to convince someone to do something they might not normally consider doing. There are a lot of strong images and passages to re-read in this play, each giving you different slices of life and hearty challenges to dissect. Of all Shakespeare’s plays, I’d put this one towards the top of most analyzed. It’s worth a read and teaches you a bit about history, too.


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For those new to me or my reviews… here’s the scoop: I read A LOT. I write A LOT. And now I blog A LOT. First the book review goes on Goodreads, and then I send it on over to my WordPress blog at https://thisismytruthnow.com, where you’ll also find TV & Film reviews, the revealing and introspective 365 Daily Challenge and lots of blogging about places I’ve visited all over the world. And you can find all my social media profiles to get the details on the who/what/when/where and my pictures. Leave a comment and let me know what you think. Vote in the poll and ratings. Thanks for stopping by.

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7 thoughts on “Review: Julius Caesar

    soultogive said:
    June 1, 2017 at 9:50 AM

    “Et tu, Brute! Then fall, Caesar.” is my favorite line. Julius Caeser was my first Shakespeare read and I don’t think I could have picked a better one. A lesson in history, definitely and what does greed of power do to friends. It’s really fun when you post a review about books that I’ve read, always love to hear people’s opinions.

    Liked by 1 person

      James J. Cudney IV responded:
      June 1, 2017 at 9:51 AM

      I agree about the line. It was a good play. I just wish I wrote so many of these reviews closer to when I read the books and plays, as they would have a lot more depth. I’ve got a few Shakespeare plays left, where I need to write the review… and then about 80 other books, so by 6/15, I’ll be up to date and then writing reviews only on the new stuff… so they will be much more detailed! Thx for sharing.

      Liked by 1 person

        soultogive said:
        June 1, 2017 at 10:02 AM

        Me too, but that’s what I do now, on GR though, I read a book and review it right away, yields the best review. The books I read earlier, I’ll review them when I read them again, but it’s great to try to review them anyways too, you can update them when you re-read.
        Wow! great! I love long detailed reviews.
        Best of luck!

        Liked by 1 person

        James J. Cudney IV responded:
        June 1, 2017 at 10:06 AM

        Thx. If you look at anything I’ve read in 2016 or 2017, you’ll see a lengthy review. But I agree with you, I’d rather read again and write the detail… but I had 450 books to catch up on! LOL

        Liked by 1 person

        soultogive said:
        June 1, 2017 at 1:16 PM

        Yeah, that’s a long time goal, reallly really long. lol

        Liked by 1 person

        James J. Cudney IV responded:
        June 1, 2017 at 1:16 PM

        lol

        Liked by 1 person

    […] Julius Caesar (1599) […]

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