365 Challenge: Day 127 – Linguistic

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Linguistic: relating to language or the study of languages

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I am from the United States of America. I speak English as my primary language. And I have taken for granted how easy it is for me to access nearly everything I need at a moment’s notice. At some point in my life, I have simply just expected the rest of the population would understand me, assuming that my language was the primary one spoken around the world. At one point earlier in my lifetime, it was a true statement. Today, I’m no longer sure if it is a true statement, as people are speaking more than English in many places. But I know I don’t take it for granted anymore. Perhaps English is not the most frequently used language, but that’s not the point behind today’s 365 Daily Challenge post. Linguistics. The study of language. Understanding different languages. Bilingual. Multilingual. Reading… Writing… Speaking… foreign languages. How many of us can truly say we can do it? That’s today’s focus.

Blogging has become a instrumental part of my day for about 6 months. I blog in English. I have followers from over 35 different countries as of this last weekend. Based on a quick look at the statistics, English is the primary language in less than 20% of those countries. How amazing is it that the world is able to understand me… wants to communicate with me… and has made an effort to learn my language so that they can understand me? Surely we in the United States of America have that same sense of camaraderie, right? I’d be shocked if we didn’t all speak at least one other language, right? I’m too lazy to check statistics, and these posts are supposed to be quick and from the heart / mind, so I won’t go verify it… But if I had to guess, I’d say maybe 80% of people in the USA barely know ten words in another language.

There’s no shame in it, as it’s not something we’ve put a priority on over the years. The world has almost always functioned with English as the general primary language in business and communication in recent years for the most part; however, it doesn’t make that fair or correct. It should be a requirement, at least in my opinion, whether mandated by a school or a parent, for children to learn and study at least one other foreign language during most of their schooling. I wasn’t forced to do it, but I chose to. And now, when I find a follower or friend or connection on social media who writes or publishes in a foreign language to me, I don’t skip over it. I go to Google Translate and learn what they said. I’ve also added the translation capability to my own blog site so that it’s a one or two step process for anyone to follow me, rather than force them to learn English.

When I selected electives for my seventh grade courses going into middle school, I chose Spanish. I had a few other options, but I felt like that was the language most other people I knew had spoken. I took classes from 7th thru 12th grade, becoming fairly fluent by the time I was 18-years old. When I was a waiter during college in the summertime, I practiced with colleagues so that I could keep up the skills. When I went to college, I chose to minor in Spanish so that I could extend my understanding of the language, as well as read literature in a foreign language. It was a tremendous benefit, as I’ve been to a few Spanish-speaking countries where it came in handy. I haven’t taken any courses in the last decade, nor read as much as I should have with Spanish as the language of the book. Unfortunately, I’ve probably lost some of those skills, but I am still strong enough to speak, read and write a good amount of Spanish.

As I grow older, I often wish I had learned other languages when I was younger. With my great interest in genealogy, German would have come in very handy over the years. I’ve taught myself some basics to be able to read documents, but I couldn’t introduce myself to a German native using the language. It’s something on my undocumented bucket list that I’d like to accomplish in the next few years. And I will do it not because I need to in order to visit the German towns where my ancestors come from, but because I have German blood and roots in me, and I want to have a connection with people in my culture beyond a basic and simple “hi, how are you?” type of deal.

I have great respect for those who can speak a few languages. You are intelligent and considerate folks who have taken the time to go beyond what you are familiar with so that you can communicate beyond your nationality. Or for those who move to a foreign country and have to learn the language in order to survive. It takes courage and strength to tackle such a feat, and you deserve big props.

For those who live in other countries, I’d love to hear your view points on learning another language other than your own, e.g. Japanese, Portuguese, Hindi, Italian, French… are you encouraged to do it? Forced? Do you learn at the same time as you learn your native tongue? Do you attempt to learn other languages beyond your native tongue and English? What do you think of Americans for often only being able to speak English? I’m not faulting or slighting anyone in America for it. Had I not chosen to do this, I would have been tasked with 2 years in middle school, and then I could have dropped it from my curriculum. It’s not always a choice for some students. Schools can’t always afford foreign language teachers. Classes are sometimes expensive as a supplemental education. I can understand how it happens, or for that matter, doesn’t happen.

But to me, learning another language is the gateway to many things, such as immersing yourself in a new culture, discovering a new society, meeting new friends, having alternative opinions, understanding history… Words are beautiful. Expressions lose their meaning in translations. I’ve always wanted to understand something in its original text. I took literature courses in Spanish and German for those reasons. And I’m sure I barely touched the surface of understanding the true meaning behind such amazing writers and stories. I’ve seen the beauty of the world outside of the languages and books I’m familiar with, and I want to experience more of it. And for those reasons, I consider myself someone with a linguistic mind. How about you?

 

RECOMMENDED BLOGGER

  • Today’s 365 Daily Challenge recommended blogger to know is Susan @ SusanLovesBooks. Susan and I connected about 4 months ago via our WordPress blogs, but I don’t remember exactly what started our friendship. She was definitely one of the first ten people I followed or who followed me. And we immediately bonded over a few things we similarly shared an interest in, but we also laughed over how I absolutely hate the heat and she was living in Arizona. I’d complain about the temperature hitting 80-something in NY. She’d laugh at me and say “Oh, it’s cool here, only 109 in Arizona today.” Seriously, that’s just wrong. But she’s just right. And even more so now that she’s moving to upstate NY! It’s still a bit away from me, but we’ll be on the same time zone and on the same coast. More fun to be had over her fun book reviews, especially the Throw-back Thursday posts and her upcoming experience with the 4 seasons again. I look forward to her insights into the world and her thoughts on life. She’s friendly with many bloggers I know, which makes it always a fun day when we all get to chatting on someone’s post about something interesting or amusing. If you haven’t met Susan, or you are looking for someone new to socialize with, take a chance on her blog. If you’re a book lover, you’ll find a treasure trove of things to look forward to each day.

 

About Me & the “365 Daily Challenge”

I’m Jay and I live in NYC. By profession, I work in technology. By passion, I work in writing. I’ve always been a reader. And now I’m a daily blogger. I decided to start my own version of the “365 Daily Challenge” where since March 13, 2017, I’ve posted a characteristic either I currently embody or one I’d like to embody in the future. 365 days of reflection to discover who I am and what I want out of life.

The goal: Knowledge. Acceptance. Understanding. Optimization. Happiness. Help. For myself. For others. And if all else fails, humor. When I’m finished in one year, I hope to have more answers about the future and what I will do with the remainder of my life. All aspects to be considered. It’s not just about a career, hobbies, residence, activities, efforts, et al. It’s meant to be a comprehensive study and reflection from an ordinary man. Not a doctor. Not a therapist. Not a friend. Not an encyclopedia full of prior research. Just pure thought, a blogged journal with true honesty.

Join the fun and read a new post each day, or check out my book reviews, TV/Film reviews or favorite vacation spots. And feel free to like, rate, comment or take the poll for each post. Note: All written content is my original creation and copyrighted to me, but the graphics and images were linked from other sites and belong to them. Many thanks to their original creators.

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54 thoughts on “365 Challenge: Day 127 – Linguistic

    Mischenko said:
    July 17, 2017 at 6:05 AM

    Great post, James. I took Spanish too, even in college, but sadly I don’t remember a lot of it. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

      James J. Cudney IV responded:
      July 17, 2017 at 6:57 AM

      Thank you. If you don’t use, you lose it. I know that feeling!

      Like

    LizScanlon said:
    July 17, 2017 at 6:24 AM

    Interesting insight here… English is the universal language… If a Russian and Swede meet, they speak English to understand each other, for example… so in that way, if English is the primary and only language one speaks- they’re set! Unless they want to go to China to start a business and get some brownie points by really integrating…
    I’m originally from Estonia so my native language is Estonian 🙂 Thinking back to my school years, I first started studying Russian since the age of 12 or so (Russian is mandatory for I’d say at least 7 years of education journey) and for all those 7 years I can hardly understand it. Maybe it was a mental block. I mean, my tests were all high marks but it all washed away as soon as the lesson was over.

    English language lessons started about 3 years earlier than Russian language lessons and I’d say 95% of the younger generation (my generation, I’m in my 30s) in Estonia can speak English. Moving on to high school (this is classes 10-12 in Estonia, age: 16-19) I studied German, French and Swedish. Swedish in my high school was mandatory because it was Swedish culture centred school (exams, oral tests, the lot). Brilliant language, very easy to learn and fun to speak. After high school I opted out of Uni and went to vocational school to study tourism and during those two years I learned German, Russian again and Finnish (which is quite similar to Estonian)… It’s been 10 years since I last went to school and apart from English and my native, I can’t call myself fluent in any other language. If you don’t use the language you learn, it just fades from memory. I did start studying Spanish on Duolingo app a couple of years ago (the app is quite brilliant) and I have some basics but I started because I simply had an interest.. I dream of living in Spain some day but… dreams are dreams 🙂
    Anyway, going back to Estonian, it belongs with one of those languages that is hard to learn. We have 14 cases! But once you have the chart for the cases in front of you, you can get by… there are some words that don’t oblige to any grammatical rule and that just blows people’s minds sometimes… if you don’t have a rule, you’ll just have to know the word for what it is… and all those letters that are hard to pronounce: õ, ä, ö, ü .. the first of those is actually only in use in Estonia- õ – which was added to the alphabet on the 19th century, so it’s kind of a ‘national treasure’ 😀
    anyway, I went off on a ramble here 😀 apologies! I just always want to spread the bit of Estonian in me!

    Liked by 4 people

      mistysbookspace said:
      July 17, 2017 at 6:36 AM

      I have never heard of that app before I think I’m going to go get it now!!

      Liked by 2 people

        LizScanlon said:
        July 17, 2017 at 6:39 AM

        Yes! They have tons of interesting languages there.. Spanish, German, Irish even, I think 😀 Have fun!

        Liked by 2 people

        mistysbookspace said:
        July 17, 2017 at 6:39 AM

        Thank you!! And thank you for mentioning the app I never would have found it otherwise.

        Liked by 2 people

        LizScanlon said:
        July 17, 2017 at 6:40 AM

        That’s my pleasure 🙂 I’m glad you’re interested in it! 🙂

        Liked by 2 people

      James J. Cudney IV responded:
      July 17, 2017 at 6:59 AM

      Wow! Awesome share. Exactly what I was hoping for… to learn what it was like for others – no need to apologize at all. Definitely great suggestion on the app. I might add that for German to start picking more up! Very cool.

      As for schooling, some things the same, but some very different. I can’t imagine learning more than 1 language at the same time, trying to sort it all out. The grammar has always been the hardest for me. I can usually read it faster than I can write it.

      Liked by 1 person

        LizScanlon said:
        July 17, 2017 at 8:09 AM

        Maybe that’s what it was- all those languages at the same time got a bit too much… now, for example, I have an interesting dilemma quite often… when I try to write in Estonian I forget a word and can only think of it in English, and vice versa… it’s hell sometimes 😀 But good luck if you do check Duolingo out.. it’s great for building vocab and it’s built in a way that you have to keep going over older exercises aswell, but all depending on personal/individual determination of course 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        James J. Cudney IV responded:
        July 17, 2017 at 8:23 AM

        Thanks. That would drive me nuts if I couldn’t remember the word from my own language and had to translate back! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      BrizzleLass said:
      July 17, 2017 at 3:54 PM

      OMG Liz that is so interesting! You seriously rock woman! 🤘

      Liked by 2 people

    mistysbookspace said:
    July 17, 2017 at 6:33 AM

    When I was in high school we were required to take a foreign language class. I took Spanish for 2 years but sadly I don’t remember enough to say I can speak another language. I basically just remember the basics.

    Liked by 1 person

      James J. Cudney IV responded:
      July 17, 2017 at 6:59 AM

      Same experience for me on the 2 year requirement. I remember a lot as I took it for 6 more years. But I totally understand.

      Liked by 1 person

        mistysbookspace said:
        July 17, 2017 at 7:02 AM

        My first year I was good at it and it came easy to me but my second year I missed a lot of school because of surgeries and stuff and it didn’t come as easy to me and I ended up just barely getting by in that class. After that I just gave up.

        Liked by 1 person

    declutteringmylifeweb said:
    July 17, 2017 at 6:45 AM

    In the European Union there are 28 member states with their own official languages. European peoples, living next to each other, have been in commercial, political and legal relationship for centuries. We have had to tackle languistic obstacles for the cooperation. I think that our history may have contributed to this multilangual socialisation.

    Liked by 1 person

      James J. Cudney IV responded:
      July 17, 2017 at 7:00 AM

      Very true. As I look at the history of my ancestors in Germany in the 1800s, constantly changing between French, German, Austrian… and even before that with the Holy Roman Empire, then the different German states and unification. I can barely figure out what they spoke when! 🙂

      Like

        declutteringmylifeweb said:
        July 17, 2017 at 7:03 AM

        🙂 furthermore one part of Europe used to belong to Soviet Union, so my parents were expected to learn Russian.

        Liked by 2 people

        James J. Cudney IV responded:
        July 17, 2017 at 7:06 AM

        My cousin lives in Ukraine and is learning Russian… she likes it but struggles a bit. She also lived in Thailand and had to learn some languages there, too. Sometimes, you need to live there to truly connect with it — or at least among people who speak it daily.

        Liked by 1 person

        declutteringmylifeweb said:
        July 17, 2017 at 7:13 AM

        Actually we are pushed to learn English in the finance sector as multinational companies and banks expect candidates to speak English. To obtain diploma in economics foreign language exam/exams is/are required here in Hungary.

        Liked by 1 person

    Mischenko said:
    July 17, 2017 at 6:46 AM

    If anyone is interested, my son used Fluenz for Spanish and loved it. He’s retained most of it as well. All on the computer, but quite expensive!

    Liked by 1 person

      James J. Cudney IV responded:
      July 17, 2017 at 7:01 AM

      Another one to check out… I am so excited this post is bringing more of us together to chat about these things. 🙂

      Like

    Noriko said:
    July 17, 2017 at 6:47 AM

    Great post, Jay!
    As a learner of English (who’s still struggling), let me answer your questions.
    1.Was I encouraged to learn English? : No. It was totally spontaneous. When I was growing up, English education started at the age of 13 – the year we started junior high school and English remained one of compulsory subjects through high school. Believe it or not, English wasn’t even my favorite subject. I didn’t particularly love or hate English. It was just one of the subject I needed to get by. But then, totally spontaneously I got intrigued to learn English probably when I was prepping for college entering examinations. In junior college, I majored in English, specifically English conversation. There was quite a long hiatus until I took up studying English again about 5 years ago, but since then, I never skipped exposing myself to any form of English. Not a single day.
    2.Other than English, I attempted to learn French and I was relatively good at reading because I found the grammar was pretty similar to that of English. But the biggest issue was pronunciation. I never got to learn how to execute the pronunciation, so I gave it up.
    3.I don’t think anything wrong with Americans not being able to speak other languages, because it is quite norm in any countries including my native country, Japan. There are lots of lots of people who are struggling to get good grades in TOEIC tests, or who can’t even carry a conversation in English or other language even after going through 6 years or even more of compulsory English education. Learning foreign language does need commitment and patience. People wants to cut corners to get better at languages or imagine 30 min per day English study will make them bilingual or something, but speaking from my own experience, unless you’re extremely talented or have a knack for learning languages, it is not that simple. So, I think it’s quite natural, I don’t find anything wrong with it.
    4.Lastly, in my eyes, English is still a dominant language in this International communities and I don’t think it will ever change. So, I’d say, ‘if you want to know about the world and open up the door to the whole new world and experience, commit to yourself. Do it or give up.’ it’s totally up to individuals.

    Liked by 1 person

      James J. Cudney IV responded:
      July 17, 2017 at 7:05 AM

      Hi, Noriko. Thank you so much for taking the time to respond to everything. Some of it I think I had assumed, but most of it was a bit surprising but in a good way. How’s the French studying going now? 🙂

      In all my Spanish courses, we took normal exams and quizzes in the class to pass, but never any state or national tests. It was mostly “if you take the class, you can pass or fail the exam, but not about certification.”

      I can’t believe you still struggle with English. You always seem to understand easily everything we share back and back on here or GR!

      Liked by 1 person

        Noriko said:
        July 17, 2017 at 7:13 AM

        Thanks for responding, Jay! Uhh… French? it’s been on the back burner for quite some time now lol
        Now, what you said about Spanish courses, that’s exactly what’s happening in Japan as far as English goes.
        Anyways, as for my English, sorry, I should have made it clear – I don’t struggle with reading English, that’s totally fine and I don’t have any difficulty (basically) but the problem is, writing and grammar … I always make silly mistakes and typos as you can see, haha!

        Liked by 1 person

        James J. Cudney IV responded:
        July 17, 2017 at 7:21 AM

        You should take comfort in knowing that you’ve mastered some of the grammar in English better or more easily than some Americans! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        Noriko said:
        July 17, 2017 at 7:22 AM

        Thank you! 😀

        Liked by 1 person

    Kristin @ Kristin Kraves Books said:
    July 17, 2017 at 7:59 AM

    Awesome post! I took French in school but that definitely never stuck! I understand some Italian because it is my grandparents first language. It is one of those situations where I can understand it but I can’t actually speak it!

    Liked by 1 person

      James J. Cudney IV responded:
      July 17, 2017 at 8:20 AM

      Thank you. Sometimes the words just get inside out head and we can’t forget them when we see them. But to speak them… painful! 🙂

      Like

    Nel said:
    July 17, 2017 at 9:02 AM

    I took Spanish for a few years in high school and I’ve been trying to pick it up ever since but so far I just haven’t had any time to really sit down and get cracking. I think the English language is hard and I feel for people who try to learn it. We have so many rules its insane and then throw in the vast amounts of slang words we have and a person can get lost. The only other language I dabbled in with was Hawaiian because I lived on Maui for 7 months. Fun fact, they only have 13 letters in their alphabet. It’s quite a simple language.

    Liked by 1 person

    susandyer1962 said:
    July 17, 2017 at 10:23 AM

    Awesome post Jay! Thank you so much for my blog recommendation! It was your trip to Sedona that brought us together I think! Whatever it was, I’m so glad to have found you my friend!!

    Liked by 1 person

    janieleeds said:
    July 17, 2017 at 11:43 AM

    English is my first language. Spanish was my second and I love it! I tried learning French and Portuguese as well, but they didn’t stick like the Spanish did. But I found that when you don’t use the language, you lose the fluency. Guess it’s time for me to take another trip to Spain where I spent my Jr. Year Abroad!

    Liked by 2 people

    Christy B said:
    July 17, 2017 at 1:35 PM

    I like that one of your goals is acceptance. Congrats on the recent blog award too and I’m going to check out some of the blogs you nominated. Have a great day!

    Liked by 1 person

      James J. Cudney IV responded:
      July 17, 2017 at 1:37 PM

      Thanks, Christy. I look forward to getting to know you and your blog more!

      Like

    wakinguponthewrongsideof50 said:
    July 17, 2017 at 3:20 PM

    I know scattering of other languages, but mostly I know how to order food and ask where the bathroom is. As you know, I think learning another language will be obsolete as we will only text one another using emojis. Which is probably good for me as I’m currently having trouble communicating in English. Great post!

    Liked by 1 person

      James J. Cudney IV responded:
      July 17, 2017 at 3:22 PM

      Thank you. I think I read this morning that today is world emoji day. seriously. someone posted about it. I wish I could remember who.

      Like

    BrizzleLass said:
    July 17, 2017 at 3:49 PM

    Fab post Jay, so things in England aren’t much different to America. Kids learn at least one European language at school from ages 11-16. I learned French, which now 20 years later I can probably muddle through the basics with having only visited France once! Most Brits are appalling when it comes to languages and embarrassingly so when in non-English speaking countries not even attempting to try the basics, shouting at people. It’s a shambles.

    Im a believer in give it a go, you can only mess it up once, I have been to Spain several times so have a grasp of the basics, enough to show I’m trying! I also used to live in Greece and although I became fluent in Greek while I lived there I am not good at retention of languages and that is now back to just the basics. I’m currently trying to find a class to brush it up again!

    One interesting fact, my nieces and nephews who live in Ireland are being taught Gaelic at school from day one they are all almost fluent, it’s quite bizarre!

    Liked by 2 people

      James J. Cudney IV responded:
      July 17, 2017 at 4:01 PM

      Love the Irish comment… that would be fun!

      If you check the other comments on this post, there were two people who suggested some apps to help. Might be worth checking into.

      Thanks for sharing! You’ve lived a few places. Greece must have been exciting.

      Like

        BrizzleLass said:
        July 18, 2017 at 11:01 AM

        Yes unfortunately those apps don’t support Greek! 😔 It’s really hard finding good apps which support Greek, I am yet to work out why!

        Yes living in other countries is amazing, I narrowly missed out on New York aswell which would have been awesome.

        Liked by 1 person

        James J. Cudney IV responded:
        July 18, 2017 at 11:30 AM

        Yes it would have been.

        Like

      LizScanlon said:
      July 18, 2017 at 8:03 AM

      It’s so cool you mentioned Gaelic… my husband is fluent and sometimes he goes off on rants in Irish and I’m like- wtf! 😀 The main thing he moans about is the difference in between ‘old’ Gaelic and ‘new’ Gaelic.. he recalls his grandmother telling him to stop using those ‘new’ words in Irish that school taught because the old way was the right way 😀 But time has moved on so they have to create words for tech, etc.
      I only know a few phrases myself- difficult language!

      Liked by 1 person

        James J. Cudney IV responded:
        July 18, 2017 at 8:10 AM

        I love how the banter about old and new Gaelic!

        Like

        BrizzleLass said:
        July 18, 2017 at 11:13 AM

        Haha! That’s so funny! I guess my Sister will be the only one who doesn’t speak it as her husband and all his family does and all her kids now do (there are five of them 😲) I would say she will learn but there is no chance of my sister learning Gaelic! She can barely speak English! 😂

        Liked by 2 people

        LizScanlon said:
        July 19, 2017 at 4:12 AM

        hahaha 😀 funny!

        Liked by 1 person

      LizScanlon said:
      July 18, 2017 at 8:04 AM

      Oh, whereabouts are your nieces and nephews?
      I live in the West Kerry Gaeltacht myself…

      Liked by 1 person

        BrizzleLass said:
        July 18, 2017 at 11:17 AM

        They are in Waterford, I’ve not been there yet, I’ve been to Dublin a few times West Kerry is right down in the south west isn’t it? My neighbour is from Cork, I have to do guess what he says I only understand 1 in every 4 words so our conversations are hilarious sometimes. I’m sure he just makes his accent thicker to wind me up.

        Liked by 2 people

        LizScanlon said:
        July 19, 2017 at 4:12 AM

        Oh, Waterford.. cool!
        Yeah, I live close to Dingle.. and I’d tell you to come and visit but avoid this place like the plague during tourist season 😀 I swear I can’t wait for winter to hit- place is packed!
        Cork! You know, they actually do have those hard to understand accents.. more so than Kerry… but if there’s one accent in Ireland I can’t understand at all-at all- it’s the Donegal people… they’re a mix of irish/english/scottish accent or something 😀 To your Cork neighbor you can say -Up Kerry! That will wind him up if he’s a GAA (gaelic football) fan at all 😀

        Liked by 1 person

        BrizzleLass said:
        July 19, 2017 at 10:11 AM

        I will have to visit in winter then! I will have to remember that when I see my neighbour next! 😂

        Liked by 2 people

    Rae Longest said:
    July 17, 2017 at 7:02 PM

    When I was in high school, my program required two years of a foreign language, and I elected to take Spanish. When I moved to Houston in 1964, I found to my dismay that Latinos here spoke Tex Mex and couldn’t understand me and vice versa. When I was ready to take the two years of college language required by my major, I tried to sign up for Spanish And II only to be told that I would have to take Spanish III and IV because I had taken and passed two years of Spanish in high school. Instead, I took two years of French solely because I loved the sound of the language. I got through that with a B and a C (college was much harder), but now I find myself inserting Spanish words into my French sentences and vice versa. In other words, I can read (and write with the help of a dictionary and a grammar handbook) both languages, but as far as understanding them, much less speaking them…forget it! The most helpful language I took was a semester of Latin in junior high. I was fascinated with it, and learning the basics made learning French and Spanish grammar much easier. Also, I can decode just about any word because I know all my Latin roots, prefixes and suffixes. The Latin really helped me score high on the vocabulary part of the College Boards. Now, math, that is another matter entirely!

    Liked by 2 people

      James J. Cudney IV responded:
      July 18, 2017 at 7:56 AM

      Isn’t it funny how we mix up our languages? I do that with some words at times. Knowing Latin is a great thing, as it helps across the board with so much else.

      Great share — thanks for all the details and different ways it’s handled. Love it when we all learn and chat on interesting topics. 🙂

      Like

      LizScanlon said:
      July 18, 2017 at 8:11 AM

      Oh gosh, I had to learn Latin for a year in high school and even though I recall the grammatics and rules being quite straight forward but it was the vocabulary that I never really beefed out. Great language to learn though…

      Liked by 1 person

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