365 Challenge: Day 147 – Teenage Jobs

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Teenage Jobs: jobs I held as a teenager to earn money prior to leaving for college

Sunday posts, the end of each week, have become a theme on This-Is-My-Truth-Now, organized by groups of five (5) focused on interesting things about my life. I’m continuing the trend of the seventh day, ending the week on Sunday, as a list (we know I love them) that provides more in depth knowledge about me.

  • Weeks 1 – 5: Primary ethnicity groups and nationalities
  • Weeks 6 – 10: A to Z Favorites
  • Weeks 11 – 15: Colors with an important meaning
  • Weeks 16 – 20: Cities I’ve lived

The next set of 5 Sundays will cover the major groups of roles / jobs / positions I’ve held over my career. I have had about fifteen titles over the years, but when I broke it down into smaller groups, I organized it into 5 clear categories, starting this first week with the jobs I held as a teenager. As a young child, I received an allowance each week so that I had some money to buy presents for holiday gifts or whatever else a pre-teen needed to spend money on. I can’t think of what else they might need it for though, right? When I turned thirteen, and I began hanging out with friends after school or — wait for it — going on dates, I needed to have a few bucks in my wallet. My parents were generous and still gave me an allowance, that is, until I took on my first job at 13-years old.

I was a newspaper delivery boy. I lived in the suburbs in a section of town where there were hundreds of homes surrounding mine, probably across to 20 to 25 different residential streets. Our newspaper carrier was a lovely woman, and when I had mentioned I needed to find a job, she asked if wanted to take on a newspaper route for her. I said sure — golly gee! — and quickly found myself with 200 papers to deliver each day. I think I made around fifty cents per week per paper, which ended up being about $100 per week. It was good money for a new teenager who was pretty frugal to begin with. She’d drop the papers off early in the morning, and I had to get them delivered by 7am, before getting ready for school. It took about 60 minutes in good weather and 90 minutes in bad weather. On bad weather days, my mom would help me by driving with the car to each block and I’d run up and down dropping newspapers at everyone’s door steps. Some days she’d help; she is an amazing mom. I was only yelled at by one customer who complained I didn’t put it in her mailbox where she liked it. But that took an extra 10 seconds to walk up to the door, whereas I could toss is from the end of the driveway much more quickly. I didn’t get much of a tip from her! I kept the job for about 6 months before it got too exhausting to wake up at 5:15 everyday and then go to school. I learned good time management skills and got in some exercise, which were nice benefits in addition to the money I’d earned.

When I turned 14-years old, I joined a bowling team at school where we competed against surrounding towns in different leagues and alleys. I was a very good bowler, which lead to my next job. After we won the competition one weekend, the manager at the bowling alley pulled a friend of mine and I aside, asking us if we wanted to work at the bowling alley as instructors and supervisors during the children’s leagues and recreation events. It sounded like an amazing job to me, as I also got to bowl for $1 per game, which meant cheap practice to become a better bowler. I took the job at Farmingdale lanes and worked about 16 hours per week, or whatever the maximum amount was for a 14 and 15 year old kid.

About half way into the job, the manager asked if I wanted to learn more about bowling operations, which I certainly thought would be a good idea. I spent a month with each of the functional areas, including the bar and restaurant, the pin setting machines, floor and alley cleaning and the front desk. I ended up doing absolutely everything, learning how to run an entire bowling at at fifteen years old. I also managed all the kid’s birthday parties and was the liaison for all the leagues at the beginning of each week’s set of games. In general, I acted about 5 years older than I really was, at least as a child. Now I act at least 10 years younger! So… first day arrives and boy was I nervous. You’re supposed to give the bowlers 5 minutes of free practice before they start the actual games. Prior to turning on the machine to prevent people from throwing the ball while the pins re-set, you’re supposed to announce that you’re doing it, so people stop throwing the ball down the alley. I forgot to make the announcement and the star bowler had just thrown his ball when I turned on the machine. His ball swerved down the lane and crashed into the pin setting machine. He was furious, came running up to the desk screaming at me. “You are gonna scratch the ball. It’s several hundred dollars. Are you an idiot? You should have made an announcement.” I felt awful, but it was an honest mistake. Phew… never did that again!

When I turned 16, things got a bit more busy with school, and my parents also couldn’t easily drive me to the bowling alley for work. I had to quit and find a job I could walk to on my own easily after school. My high school was 1 mile from where lived, and the road went directly through the center of my hometown where a grocery store, King Kullen, served our community. I was hired fairly quickly as a cashier, but they moved me around between produce and the inventory stock areas. I’d leave school to start my shift at 3pm. I could only work 3 hours and 45 minutes max per day per the laws for a 16 or 17 year old at the time, so I clocked out at 6:45 and was home by 7:15 for dinner with my parents and then homework. I usually had 3 shifts during the week and both Saturday and Sunday. It was one of my favorite jobs because I was really good at bagging groceries and handling money. My supervisor always put me on the express check-out because I was extremely efficient, which meant customers were happy.

It was a little awkward when my mom would shop there, or even when friends came in to say hello. I also had my first crush on a ‘younger’ girl back then, too. I was 17, she was 15, but I stole her away from her boyfriend; yes, I was a bit of a bad boy! In my defense, she was very flirty and he was a bad boyfriend. So I just happened to look like an angel, which made it easy for her to turn to me — the supportive good guy friend-turned-new boyfriend. It only lasted a few weeks, but I remember getting in trouble with our boss because we were dating and they didn’t know. I think they were just jealous! In the end, we lost touch, and I decided not to date too many girls a few years later given the whole TRUTH discovery thing… ah, the turns life takes… but then I graduated from high school and had to quit the job to move to Pennsylvania when I went to college. More on that next week.

My first few jobs were typical and not so typical for a teenager. As a newspaper boy, I had my hands all over written words, which probably helped me decide to be a writer. As a bowling instructor and jack-of-all-trades, I learned how to teach and mentor others, as well as the ins-and-outs of the business world. And at the grocery store, I learned about multi-tasking, money management and customer service. All good skills to gain from 13 to 17 before starting a major phase of life. I enjoyed working, but when I think about how long I’ve either been in school or worked full-time, it’s no wonder I needed this little break right now. Wait… break? Who you kidding? I’ve got novels to publish, books to write, blogs to post and connections to make. So maybe I ought to close out this one and focus on tomorrow’s, as it’s gonna be a really fun one. Thanks for listening to my Teenage Job report… what did you do for work or money when you were a youngster?

 

RECOMMENDED BLOGGER

  • Today’s 365 Daily Challenge recommended blogger to know is Ann @ Ann’s Reading Corner. Ann and I connected several months ago when I saw a book review she’d written on Pretty Little Liars. I had recently finished watching all 7 seasons of the TV show, one of my guilty pleasures, and felt the need to talk about all the time. We laughed over the books and a few episodes, but then she tagged me on a blog award, and I tagged her… we quickly became online friends, commenting on each other’s different books and TV show recaps. Everything from The Hunger Games to issues with bringing back characters from the grave too often. She’s a bright young blogger with lots of potential and a great sense of style in her words, hobbies, books and shows. If you don’t believe me, check out the below blurb from her About Me section and then go visit the site yourself:
    • “Oh hi! I didn’t see you there! Let me introduce myself. My name is Ann and I will be your person tour guide through everything you need to know about the person behind this screen. Are you ready for the ride? Are you? I don’t think you are!!! Ann was born into an interesting family. As the oldest to two sisters and no brothers, she has to experiences things first. But that also means that she gets the newest of everything, which drives her sisters insane. Her mom works at a local middle school as the media coordinator who is originally from Pennsylvania and her dad is retired military who is still making airplanes to this day who is from Ohio. How they both met in North Carolina is still a mystery to Ann. Ann has always had a passion for reading. As a kid, she would love the times that her mom and her would lay in bed and read together. She remembers all the times that she and her mom would switch back and forth with reading to help Ann improve her speech (she had some speech issues while she was younger. She still can’t say ‘world’ correctly and it has been ten years). As she grew up, she was introduced to so many new books and she grew this love of reading.”

 

About Me & the “365 Daily Challenge”

I’m Jay and I live in NYC. By profession, I work in technology. By passion, I work in writing. I’ve always been a reader. And now I’m a daily blogger. I decided to start my own version of the “365 Daily Challenge” where since March 13, 2017, I’ve posted a characteristic either I currently embody or one I’d like to embody in the future. 365 days of reflection to discover who I am and what I want out of life.

The goal: Knowledge. Acceptance. Understanding. Optimization. Happiness. Help. For myself. For others. And if all else fails, humor. When I’m finished in one year, I hope to have more answers about the future and what I will do with the remainder of my life. All aspects to be considered. It’s not just about a career, hobbies, residence, activities, efforts, et al. It’s meant to be a comprehensive study and reflection from an ordinary man. Not a doctor. Not a therapist. Not a friend. Not an encyclopedia full of prior research. Just pure thought, a blogged journal with true honesty.

Join the fun and read a new post each day, or check out my book reviews, TV/Film reviews or favorite vacation spots. And feel free to like, rate, comment or take the poll for each post. Note: All written content is my original creation and copyrighted to me, but the graphics and images were linked from other sites and belong to them. Many thanks to their original creators.

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57 thoughts on “365 Challenge: Day 147 – Teenage Jobs

    wakinguponthewrongsideof50 said:
    August 6, 2017 at 9:20 PM

    The bowling alley job sounds amazing! I was a babysitter and worked at a clothing store. My job was the first time I began to feel confident in my abilities. My daughter tutors.

    Liked by 1 person

    Ann said:
    August 6, 2017 at 9:36 PM

    It’s funny that you happened to talk about teen jobs the day after my mom asked me if I was planning on getting a job after marching band practices and all stops. When we were on vacation, my mom was also telling me about the time she delivered papers and with what both of you said, I would have hated it. Your story about how you stole the ‘younger’ girl away from her boyfriend had me laughing like crazy! How dare you do something like that! LOL! Thanks for featuring me. You have no idea how big of a smile I have on my face right now 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

      James J. Cudney IV responded:
      August 6, 2017 at 9:39 PM

      You are very welcome! I am sorry the post came out so late today. I lost the hour I had free in the afternoon to something else, and then I was out later than expected this evening. Oops, now I’ll be up later than I planned, too. LOL

      You’re a really cool blogger and I enjoy chatting! I hope it send a few new folks your way to check out your site.

      As for the job, don’t do it! Get something fun and something you can learn about at the same time. 🙂

      I know… I didn’t really steal her, she was unhappy, and well, I just made it easy to go from one to another! lol

      Liked by 1 person

        Ann said:
        August 6, 2017 at 9:50 PM

        That is totally fine! I know what it is like to have a million thing going on and having to plan writing somewhere in there.
        I really enjoy chatting too! I don’t think people realize how much chatting with others means to people. I always get a smile on my face when we chat. Or it is because I have been up for like 15 hours… anyway.
        When it comes to the job, I have no idea what I would want to do. I’m too young to work at the local bookstore, which is really unfair. I couldn’t work in a restaurant because of rude people.
        It’s always a nice thing to make someone else life easier… even if you have to steal them.

        Liked by 1 person

        James J. Cudney IV responded:
        August 6, 2017 at 10:43 PM

        Chatting is good! Sometimes it’s hard with everything going on, but if you are gonna have a blog, you need to make time to chat — at least that’s what I think!

        Book store would be an awesome job. How old do they require?

        Liked by 1 person

        Ann said:
        August 7, 2017 at 3:24 PM

        For sure. Communicating with the people that read your blog is a must in my book as well.
        At the book store in town, they require you to be over 18. Since I’m 16, I’m too young to work there. I would love to have that job though.

        Liked by 1 person

        James J. Cudney IV responded:
        August 7, 2017 at 4:31 PM

        Hmmm… I thought book stores would be more open. Ugh, so you have to wait a bit. Sorry!

        Liked by 1 person

        Ann said:
        August 7, 2017 at 7:49 PM

        I thought the same thing. I was hoping to work there since I knew so much about books but I guess that is out of the question.

        Liked by 1 person

    I went from babysitting, to working in a nursing home, to being a page at the library, which was the best job of my teen years as it made me realize I wanted to be a librarian.😊

    Liked by 2 people

    Mischenko said:
    August 6, 2017 at 10:40 PM

    Very interesting, James. I pretty much grew up in the bowling alley because my grandparents bowled on leagues. Memories. Unfortunately I was never a great bowler, but my brother is in the newspaper all the time breaking records, lol. Thinking of bowling is nostalgic to me and your post took me down memory lane. )

    My first was bagging groceries, then a kitchen store, and then on to mall jobs like Orange Julius.

    My mom delivered newspapers as her first job, but she was so young. I don’t even know if they’d let younger teens deliver papers anymore. I think she was 12 and you said 13, hmm…

    Great post! ♡

    Liked by 1 person

      James J. Cudney IV responded:
      August 6, 2017 at 10:58 PM

      Thanks! Seems like we share even more in common. I loved bowling so much! A kitchen store? That must have been pretty cool. Love that stuff.

      Liked by 1 person

    Kristin said:
    August 6, 2017 at 11:23 PM

    Saw this on Facebook and had to pop on for a few seconds. Even though the banshee baby is insisting she can’t/won’t sleep and I need to be…

    Moving along, I started working when I was 14. I took a job as a “Santa’s helper” at the mall.

    Then a couple months later, I started working at a local food place as I’d turned 15. I graduated in May of my 15th year and took on another job. Juggling the diner and odd jobs at the mall as well as working at a science museum on Saturdays.

    Once I turned 16, I moved on from the two odd jobs to working the diner and Footlocker. Plus, going to college.

    Eventually, I quit the Footlocker job and the diner for one job at a local furniture plant. I could make more money there in a week than two weeks at the other two places.

    I also held volunteer positions from 13-15 at the Library and the Fairgrounds.

    Liked by 1 person

      James J. Cudney IV responded:
      August 6, 2017 at 11:29 PM

      Sorry she won’t sleep 😦

      You’ve had lots of jobs, probably learned a tremendous amount from each one, some good and some not so good — definitely what you wouldn’t want to do again! the volunteer stuff sounds the best!

      Liked by 1 person

        Kristin said:
        August 6, 2017 at 11:31 PM

        Volunteer for the library was great. Fairgrounds, not so much.

        No one is appreciative of the hours and hours spent mucking stalls! No one!

        Liked by 1 person

        James J. Cudney IV responded:
        August 6, 2017 at 11:34 PM

        yeah, they probably don’t want to think about it

        Liked by 1 person

        Kristin said:
        August 6, 2017 at 11:38 PM

        Honestly, in the south and 20 some years ago, I think most farmers/ranchers thought they were entitled to KIDS cleaning up after their animals.

        I had tachycardia and I still remember this hateful old man yelling at me because I stopped cleaning a stall to get some water! 🙄

        I mean, dang, I get that they couldn’t just sit at the fairgrounds to care for their animals all day.

        But they could have been nice to volunteers.

        Liked by 1 person

        James J. Cudney IV responded:
        August 6, 2017 at 11:40 PM

        it doesn’t cost anything to be nice… people are awful sometimes 😦

        Liked by 1 person

    declutteringmylifeweb said:
    August 7, 2017 at 12:29 AM

    I worked in a Woman’s fitness club. As I had been a regular customer, I ended up working at the reception besides school. I did not have to pay the pass, although my wage was ridiculously low. However, it was the ordinary salary for that job.

    Liked by 1 person

    coffeelovingbookoholic said:
    August 7, 2017 at 1:32 AM

    you worked in an bowling alley? that’s so cool. i love bowling! i worked a lot of bad jobs, like bakery (very early mornings), cleaning machines (very dirty days) until i was hired in a grocery store, where i stayed 7 years all the way until i left for my semester abroad. i had such a good time there and the money was very good. got my licence and car from it – yay! but after coming back from the usa, i worked in the cinema to get while while i was studying – that was the best job ever – i loved it. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

      James J. Cudney IV responded:
      August 7, 2017 at 7:37 AM

      The cinema would be very cool. A bakery too, except for the mornings and eating so much. Lol. Bowling was great. Learned everything. Met so many fun people.

      Liked by 1 person

    BrizzleLass said:
    August 7, 2017 at 2:49 AM

    Great jobs! I can’t believe you’ve made jobs sound interesting!
    So, my first job when I was 15 was in a local shoe store, it was next to a butchers, and shared the same back stairs to the stock room, every time I had to collect shoes for someone to try I swear I nearly liked my guts up. I was paid only £72 per month, it was slave labour! The manager was evil, but I loved the supervisor (who coincidentally lives opposite me now!) I stayed there just over a year until I was fired for refusing overtime because I had my final exams coming up. It’s the only time I’ve been fired.
    After that I moved to working at a 4* hotel as a chambermaid. Oh I hated that job, really hated it. I only stuck at it for about six months. Even meeting famous people didn’t make up for having to clean 12 rooms every shift.
    I was 17 and at college by then so I went and started working nights at a call centre. It meant I could study while I worked, they didn’t mind what we did as long as the calls for answered so I worked 10pm-8am three nights per week. The money was good, I worked with my cousin aswell and I got loads of study done, it was a win win…except the almost nightly bomb threats! 😂

    Liked by 2 people

      James J. Cudney IV responded:
      August 7, 2017 at 7:43 AM

      Yikes. Those were hardcore jobs. Cleaning and overnight labor.

      But bomb threats? Not good! When did you sleep? THat must have adjusted your whole day with classes.

      Like

        BrizzleLass said:
        August 7, 2017 at 8:49 AM

        Yeah the bomb threats were interesting, we would have to traipse outside for a few hours while the fire service swept the building!
        I didn’t sleep much, I now know I was newly into having bipolar then and very manic, I would go straight from work to college then I would go out my evenings off partying. I was a mess, I would only sleep maybe 2 nights a week. 😩

        Liked by 1 person

        James J. Cudney IV responded:
        August 7, 2017 at 8:51 AM

        yikes! what we could do when younger… sometimes that energy should be bottled up to save for the future

        Like

        BrizzleLass said:
        August 7, 2017 at 10:11 AM

        I know right! I would last about five minutes into that schedule now!

        Liked by 1 person

    Nel said:
    August 7, 2017 at 7:03 AM

    Oh the paper routes. My first job was a paper route as well. I think I was 13 or 14 at the time. It was pretty fun. Then when school got to be a lot of work, I would only work summer jobs. One I worked for the city two summers in a row going around painting fire hydrants with other kids. Then in high school, I was homeschooled the first two years and I was moderator for a homework help chatroom and then when I was 16-17 I worked in a factory that used machines to press packaging together for lightbulbs. I bought my first laptop and a whole new wardrobe for college with my hard earned monies. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

      James J. Cudney IV responded:
      August 7, 2017 at 7:47 AM

      Serious job in the factory! Nice.

      Homeschooled? Interesting. I Want to hear more about that. Sounds like a good post!

      Liked by 1 person

        Nel said:
        August 7, 2017 at 7:48 AM

        I should write a post about that someday haha. Thanks for the idea 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

    mistysbookspace said:
    August 7, 2017 at 8:45 AM

    My very first job was as a cashier at Ingles. I left Ingles to go work at a telemarketing company I don’t even remember how long that lasted and then ended up back at Ingles. I eventually became a pharmacy technician at Ingles Pharmacy. And now I’m a stay at home wife.

    Liked by 1 person

      James J. Cudney IV responded:
      August 7, 2017 at 8:47 AM

      telemarketing! the one job I think I would hate. I can’t sell anything! I always feel bad. I’m glad you got out!

      Liked by 1 person

        mistysbookspace said:
        August 7, 2017 at 8:56 AM

        I wasn’t the greatest at it. I had one week that I did really good and sold like 10 packages or something like that. It wasn’t very fun at all lol.

        Liked by 1 person

    marielisab said:
    August 7, 2017 at 11:23 AM

    Now I know that the awesome and efficient work ethic I observed in your later years started when you were a young’un (I had to look that up for correct spelling). HaHa.

    My teen jobs included working for my aunt in the hardware store/tractor dealership where she was a co-owner. A great role model of a single woman having a successful business in a man’s world. I loved taking inventory, unpacking new merchandise and doing all the filing in the office. Hated the customer facing part. I was painfully shy and would sometime hide in the back to avoid waiting on a customer.

    Not much passion for my other jobs, just heads down working to save money for college.

    Babysitting (soooo happy when the little rug rats, oops the little cuties were in bed asleep), sorting radishes at a produce plant (8 hours of standing on the line pulling bad radishes off a moving belt – ugh!), picking beans/pickles/etc. for a truck farmer (had a great tan and a summer crush ), dishwasher and line attendant at nursing home kitchen (free food !), cleaning rooms and bathrooms at nursing home ( I will leave it to your imagination on things I had to deal with..)

    All in all, not horrible, but happy to be past those working years.

    Thanks for initiating the trip down memory lane…..

    Liked by 1 person

      James J. Cudney IV responded:
      August 7, 2017 at 4:18 PM

      You are welcome. You had good jobs. Difficult, but not horrific like some I’ve seen / heard. I had good ones. I was lucky.

      I don’t envy the nursing home one tho. And thanks for the compliment!

      Like

    carhicks said:
    August 7, 2017 at 12:17 PM

    Some great jobs there. Mine were very eclectic. I detassled corn, babysat, rode a dickee dee ice-cream bike, was a chamber maid, cleaned my aunt and her friends apartments, worked at a meat stall at the downtown market, was a waitress, cashier and bartender, housekeeping at an old-age home, and a teacher assistant in summer school. I started working at age 12 and never looked back.

    Liked by 1 person

      James J. Cudney IV responded:
      August 7, 2017 at 4:21 PM

      de-tassled corn? that sounds kinda fun! Starting at 12 is young, but it certainly makes you smarter and a hard worker!

      Like

        carhicks said:
        August 8, 2017 at 7:08 AM

        My dad died when I was only 8 and my mom had 5 of us to raise. If I wanted anything special, I had to earn the money. It taught me a lot about work, responsibilities and that I needed to be sure I really wanted/needed something. All good values I used as an adult. She was a great mom who always had time for us and took us to church every Sunday morning. She knew what was important.

        Liked by 1 person

        James J. Cudney IV responded:
        August 8, 2017 at 7:09 AM

        I’m sorry you lost your dad so young. But glad you had a wonderful mom and such good memories.

        Liked by 1 person

    scr4pl80 said:
    August 7, 2017 at 1:03 PM

    My first job (other than babysitting) was in our local library as a page too! I loved that job and had it all through high school and into college. I only left when I finished my Medical Assistant’s course and got my job in the medical field.

    Liked by 1 person

      James J. Cudney IV responded:
      August 7, 2017 at 4:22 PM

      library jobs always seem so calming!

      Liked by 2 people

        Valerie @ Valerie's Musings said:
        August 8, 2017 at 1:31 PM

        It sounds like you got some great money management skills as a kid/teen. I always wished I had that. I’m just now really starting to get a grip on it. Your jobs sound like good jobs too. 🙂

        My dad was out of work a lot when I was a kid and he didn’t want my mom to work until my brother and I were both in school so I never got an allowance on a regular basis. I always wanted a job as a teen because I wanted a steady source of income, but my folks were adamant about me not working until towards the end of my senior year. I really think it would’ve been a good thing for me to work after school somewhere. I was way too anti-social as a kid/teen and it hasn’t gotten any better. :-/ Maybe getting out by working somewhere would’ve forced me out of my comfort zone before my habits were too formed.

        Liked by 1 person

        James J. Cudney IV responded:
        August 8, 2017 at 3:58 PM

        You might have a point about it being different when you were a kid. But it also could have made things worse for you sooner, and then you might have not have been strong enough to manage them as well as you do today! Just thinking aloud.

        either way, I appreciate hearing more about you. 🙂 It helps understand someone more especially when you are talking online.

        Liked by 1 person

        Valerie @ Valerie's Musings said:
        August 8, 2017 at 1:32 PM

        Whoops – my comment wasn’t supposed to be a reply but oh well. Library jobs are calming depending on what you DO in the library. If you’re working with the public it’s anything but calming most days, but a page/shelver or someone behind the scenes, like me, yeah, those can be calming. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        James J. Cudney IV responded:
        August 8, 2017 at 3:58 PM

        it happens! very true. rude patrons might not be so fun.

        Liked by 1 person

        Valerie @ Valerie's Musings said:
        August 8, 2017 at 4:06 PM

        Nope. Not to mention the drunks, those that are high, those whose mental illness is not under control, etc.

        Liked by 1 person

        James J. Cudney IV responded:
        August 8, 2017 at 4:08 PM

        i never even thought about that. i just think of it as a solitary place where only the quiet ones come in. ouch, sorry!

        Liked by 1 person

        Valerie @ Valerie's Musings said:
        August 8, 2017 at 4:19 PM

        That’s what everyone thinks. But we’re a public building. We welcome all as long as they’re sober and follow the rules.

        Liked by 1 person

    Christy B said:
    August 9, 2017 at 1:35 PM

    I totally get that waking up at 5:15 to deliver papers and then going to school would be tiring – glad you lasted the 6 months 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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