Book Review: Fantasy & Science Fiction

Book Review: The Psychology of Time Travel by Kate Mascarenhas (Blog Tour Stop)

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Welcome! I’m the final stop today on the blog tour for a new book titled The Psychology of Time Travel by Kate Mascarenhas. A few key facts about the book before I share my review and other information about the blog tour:

Format: Hardcover, 336 pages
Publication Date: February 12th 2019 by Crooked Lane Books
Genre: Science-Fiction, Mystery
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Perfect for fans of Naomi Alderman’s The Power and Margot Lee Shetterly’s Hidden Figures comes The Psychology of Time Travel, a mind-bending, time-travel debut.

In 1967, four female scientists worked together to build the world’s first time machine. But just as they are about to debut their creation, one of them suffers a breakdown, putting the whole project—and future of time travel—in jeopardy. To protect their invention, one member is exiled from the team—erasing her contributions from history.

Fifty years later, time travel is a big business. Twenty-something Ruby Rebello knows her beloved grandmother, Granny Bee, was one of the pioneers, though no one will tell her more. But when Bee receives a mysterious newspaper clipping from the future reporting the murder of an unidentified woman, Ruby becomes obsessed: could it be Bee? Who would want her dead? And most importantly of all: can her murder be stopped?

Traversing the decades and told from alternating perspectives, The Psychology of Time Travel introduces a fabulous new voice in fiction and a new must-read for fans of speculative fiction and women’s fiction alike.

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My Review

The Psychology of Time TravelThe Psychology of Time Travel by Kate Mascarenhas

My rating: 4.25 of 5 stars

Time travel is a complex subject. From my childhood days of reading ‘The Time Machine’ by H. G. Wells and watching the movie ‘Back to the Future’ to my adulthood escapes into devouring several new books about the topic, it’s been prevalent all my life. Often the theme focuses on ‘what would you change about the past’ and ‘what happens if you alter reality.’ While those ideas are covered in Mascarenhas’ novel, the Psychology of Time Travel also focuses on exactly what the title implies — the psychological [and physical] impacts on people who have traveled through time. It’s a fascinating topic handled quite adeptly and set against a backdrop of drama in which readers learn very early on, someone has been murdered… yet we don’t know who it is!

I’ll say from the beginning, I enjoyed this story immensely but I also recognized it’s not the kind of book where you’ll understand everything all in one read. Perhaps I’m not smart enough, but there were so many moments where I found myself trying to determine exactly what could’ve happened to lead to the woman’s death. As the layers of this onion peeled away, scenes from a seventy-year period became clues about the murder. But the part that keeps you analyzing every little aspect of the story is not only (1) who is the woman, but (2) what time period is she from! That’s what makes it such a clever and intriguing story. At several points in the book, characters meet themselves in different decades of their lives, and they also live exclusively in another decade rather than the one they should be living in. So… if you’re smart and intuitive, you’ll be totally enthralled no matter what. If you’re like me (whatever that means), forget some of those boundaries and rules… and enjoy the novel as a thoroughly wonderful mystery and a discovery of how people change throughout time.

One of the best parts of the book is the connection I felt with most of the characters. Whether it was the girl who found the body in a museum where she worked, or the determination of a scientist who had a bit of a breakdown trying to force her way back into the time travel program, Mascarenhas offers heavy emotions and painful actions to depict all the ways someone can be hurt. How can one woman be so cold to turn her back on a friend just because it might hurt the time travel program? How can another sabotage science for personal gain? Do you let someone do something you fear just because you know they’ll be hurt even if they don’t? The book tosses out more questions than answers at times, but honestly… some of those answers are probably up to interpretation by a reader and each individual personality. This is where the psychological aspects come into play. We’re all going to read this book differently because we all identify with life experiences differently.

As a mystery, it’s non-traditional. An amateur sleuth or a detective is not trying to solve the murder; this approach is not the forefront of the story. The answers unfold as we see what happens over time to several characters who ask questions in different time periods. It’s a cool concept, and it helps the author focus on many other brilliant parts of these women’s lives. For example, romance… a girl falls in love with one of these women, but they’re nearly 40 years apart in age — except when you travel to different time periods, that’s no longer true. Another example, a woman yearns to help those who are being hurt by time travel, but she doesn’t know how to fix it other than do something illegal. In time, we see how all these events are connected and encourage the dramatic standoff that leads to someone’s death.

The writing is great. The characters are all flawed but you root for them even when they do something wrong. Well… maybe not one of them who just irritated me non-stop once I learned she wasn’t as nice as she appeared to be. A villain is necessary, so it’s not anything negative about the book. It’s actually something well done by Mascarenhas because you love to hate this woman. I wanted to shake her until the truth came out. It’s fantastic when a writer can evoke such emotion from a reader. All this said, I end up giving the book 4.25 stars. So much of it was beautiful and engaging. A few parts were overly complex and left out a few things that might have made the whole story even more connected and immersive. I’d definitely read future works from the author.

View all my reviews

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About the Author

Kate Mascarenhas is a writer.

Born in 1980, she is of mixed heritage (white Irish father, brown British mother) and has family in Ireland and the Republic of Seychelles.

She studied English at Oxford and Applied Psychology at Derby. Her PhD, in literary studies and psychology, was completed at Worcester.

Since 2017 Kate has been a chartered psychologist. Previously she has been an advertising copywriter, bookbinder, and doll’s house maker. She lives in the English midlands with her partner.

Her new novel, The Psychology of Time Travel, will be published by Head of Zeus in August 2018.

Mascarenhas Author Photo Credit Matt Murtagh

What an amazing fabric!

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Who Else is on the Blog Tour?

The tour has nine (9) stops and you can see the blog names listed below. Stop by to check out everyone’s opinions or to enter the giveaway contest and win a free copy…

PTT Blog Tour

I hope you enjoyed stopping by my blog to be part of this fun tour. Many thanks to Sarah @ Crooked Lane Books for including me in this opportunity. I’ve come to love Crooked Lane as a publisher and read many of their books. It’s been a blast… can’t wait until my next tour with them in early 2019. Tell me what you thought of the blog tour, the review, and whether you’re gonna read this book! Only time will tell, I suppose… right?

About Me
For those new to me or my reviews… here’s the scoop: I’m Jay, an author who lives in NYC. My stand-alone novels, Watching Glass Shatter and Father Figure, can be purchased on Amazon as electronic copies or physical copies. My new book series, Braxton Campus Mysteries, will fit those who love cozy mysteries and crime investigations. There are two books: Academic Curveball and Broken Heart Attack. I read, write, and blog A LOT on this site where you can also find all my social media profiles to get the details on the who/what/when/where and my pictures. Leave a comment and let me know what you think. Thanks for stopping by. Note: All written content is my original creation and copyrighted to me, but the graphics and images were linked from other sites and belong to them. Many thanks to their original creators. Follow my blog with Bloglovin.

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Book Review: Pawns by Patrick Hodges

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Pawns (Wielders of Arantha, #1)Pawns by Patrick Hodges

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Creativia, a publisher with a vast range of fantastic authors, is a go-to stop for me each month. I choose at least one new author and often a minimally-read genre (for me) to expand my knowledge and literary exposure. This month, I went with the first book, Pawns, in a three-book fantasy series called The Wielders of Arantha written in 2016 by Patrick Hodges. For those who follow my reviews, I rarely read science-fiction or fantasy because I tend to want to know all the rules of what can and what cannot happen. I’ve picked up a few popular ones, a few non-popular ones, and now I’m reading recommendations from others I trust… maybe one day I’ll actually be a mega fan!

Hodges kicks off the ~400 page book with a prologue from a dying woman who knows she has only a few breaths left. She hopes she’s done enough to protect her race and train the new protectress of her kind, but sadly she will never know as she breathes her last moment forever. Immediately, readers are thrust into a spaceship crash where we learn a woman has recently lost her husband to ‘the cause’ and she’s working with his protegee to navigate the ship as well as protect her teenage son. But there’s an accident, the protegee dies, and she is stuck trying to figure out how to fulfill her husband’s last wish to protect their kind. Who are they and are they related to the woman in the prologue? Then we meet a brother and a sister who at first seem like angry, vengeful people…. then we meet the daughter from the prologue… and then… it goes on switching character perspectives and story-lines. I’ll leave out the rest of the plot because there are 3 books and so much I could cover… suffice to say, this is quite a book and saga.

After the first 10%, we’ve met most of the major characters and understand enough of their plight and history. We don’t know how they connect to one another nor how all the planets or worlds function. In many ways, this is no different than a novel where you’ve got a bunch of characters who are somehow connected, but you don’t find out until midway thru — just there’s science fiction and fantasy holding it together. That’s when I realized I had immersed myself in the various stories. I worried less about the rules and began to care about each protagonist or supporting character. A mother fighting for her son… siblings with a tortured past… a daughter hoping to live up to her mother’s expectations while raising her own daughter who’s rebellious and likely to cause a major issue for their society. It’s a captivating story. I definitely found myself anxious to know who knew who… and when you realize there are different names/beliefs for people depending on the world you come from, it’s even more of a thriller and suspense ride.

Hodges has created a wonderful saga in Arantha full of human (and not so human) emotions that speak to readers of all kinds. His writing style is smooth and easy, but descriptive and intriguing. I found myself following along quite well for the most part, and the only times I pulled away from the story were when it got deeper into the fantasy and science-fiction elements. BUT… that’s only due to my reading style and genre preferences. The book is full of traditional fantasy and science fiction components that I’ve experienced in Star Trek or Lord of the Rings or The Hunger Games. Hodges is adept at keeping a good balance to satisfy a hard-core genre fan but also bring in a new set of readers who aren’t ready to commit to something so different. That’s a good writer!

I will read book two in early 2019 after I finish some commitments already set for this year. I’m curious to find out how some of the action sequences and cliffhanger revelations at the end of this first book will play out. A surprise genealogical connection (which I love), a potential death (traumatic but necessary), a potential pregnancy, and a fit of rage… who’s gonna win? Who’s gonna suffer more? Throw in the beginnings of a romance between different species (I think), and the book has a bit of everything built inside its pages. A definite recommend for all sorts of readers but definitely those who love trilogies (with a prequel novella too) and fantasy. Don’t miss out on this one.

View all my reviews

About Me
For those new to me or my reviews… here’s the scoop: I’m Jay, an author who lives in NYC. My stand-alone novels, Watching Glass Shatter and Father Figure, can be purchased on Amazon as electronic copies or physical copies. The debut book, Academic Curveball, in my new mystery series, Braxton Campus Mysteries will fit those who love cozy mysteries and crime investigations. I read, write, and blog A LOT. First the book review goes on Goodreads, and then I send it on over to my WordPress blog at https://thisismytruthnow.com, where you’ll find the revealing and introspective 365 Daily Challenge –and multiple Readathons. You can also find all my social media profiles to get the details on the who/what/when/where and my pictures. Leave a comment and let me know what you think. Thanks for stopping by. Note: All written content is my original creation and copyrighted to me, but the graphics and images were linked from other sites and belong to them. Many thanks to their original creators. Follow my blog with Bloglovin.

Book Review: Tales of the River Vine – The Boy Who Carried a Forest in His Pocket by Jean Lee

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Tales of the River Vine: The Boy Who Carried a Forest in His PocketTales of the River Vine: The Boy Who Carried a Forest in His Pocket by Jean Lee

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I stumbled across this author through her blog and enjoyed her writing and comments. When an opportunity to read a short story / prequel of her upcoming novel, I was interested in giving it a chance. I’m not normally a fantasy reader, so I wasn’t sure how it would end up. I can now say it went extremely well and based on the short story, I’m looking forward to reading the book in the coming months. It launches at the end of October 2018, but for now, I wanted to share my thoughts on the story about the boy who carried a forest in his pocket. HMMM… that sounds very cool!

The story itself is under 15 pages, but it’s a fantastic introduction to the type of book her full-length novel (See Below) will be when it’s released on Halloween 2018. And she’s giving away 1000 copies — how awesome is that? So… a small town… a religious woman… a kind woman on a farm with a few kids… which is the better mom? Their interaction and dialog is very telling. Then… the kids meet a stranger, and this stranger performs a magic trick. Add in a squirrel, some very unusual children, and a curious mind, then you’ve got quite the beginning to what seems to be a very well-thought out universe of characters and stories. I’m curious to read more beyond this one, and with a title about a forest in a pocket, how could it not be awesome. I can’t wait to see all the imagery and graphics that appear in my mind from the author’s creativity.

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Fallen Princeborn: Stolen. Coming Halloween 2018

In rural Wisconsin, an old stone wall is all that separates the world of magic from the world of man—a wall that keeps the shifters inside. When something gets out, people disappear. Completely.

Escaping from an abusive uncle, eighteen-year-old Charlotte is running away with her younger sister Anna. Together they board a bus. Little do they know that they’re bound for River Vine—a shrouded hinterland where dark magic devours and ancient shapeshifters feed, and where the seed of love sets root among the ashes of the dying.

Fallen Princeborn: Stolen is the first in a series of young-adult dark-fantasy novels by Jean Lee. Watch for book 2 in March 2019. Read Tales of the River Vine, a collection of FREE short stories based on the characters in the Fallen Princeborn omnibus.

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Links for Stories

Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07HHCDJVW/

Nook: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/s/tales+of+the+river+vine/_/N-8qa?_requestid=2147697

Other outlets: https://www.books2read.com/b/mBPXQR

Channillo: https://channillo.com/series/middler-s-pride/

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Middler's Pride

Who is Jean Lee?

Jean Lee is a Wisconsin born and bred writer excited to share her young adult fiction with those who love to find other worlds hidden in the humdrum of everyday life. Lee’s short story collection Tales of the River Vine is currently available for free download on Amazon, Nook, and other markets. Her serialized fantasy Middler’s Pride is available via the Indie E-magazine Channillo. Lee’s first novel, Fallen Princeborn: Stolen, debuts Halloween 2018 from Aionios Books. She currently lives in the Madison area with her husband and three children.

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Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100012373211758

Twitter: https://twitter.com/jeanleesworld

Amazon Author Page: https://www.amazon.com/Jean-Lee/e/B07DPP2RV6/

Website: https://jeanleesworld.com/

Publisher Site: https://aioniosbooks.com/jean-lee

Instagram: @jeanleesworld

Email: jeanleesworld@gmail.com

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About Me
For those new to me or my reviews… here’s the scoop: I’m Jay, an author who lives in NYC. My stand-alone novels, Watching Glass Shatter and Father Figure, can be purchased on Amazon as electronic copies or physical copies. The debut book, Academic Curveball, in my new mystery series, Braxton Campus Mysteries will fit those who love cozy mysteries and crime investigations. I read, write, and blog A LOT. First the book review goes on Goodreads, and then I send it on over to my WordPress blog at https://thisismytruthnow.com, where you’ll find the revealing and introspective 365 Daily Challenge –and multiple Readathons. You can also find all my social media profiles to get the details on the who/what/when/where and my pictures. Leave a comment and let me know what you think. Thanks for stopping by. Note: All written content is my original creation and copyrighted to me, but the graphics and images were linked from other sites and belong to them. Many thanks to their original creators. Follow my blog with Bloglovin.

Book Review: The Anchor is Key by Linda Anthony Hill

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I belong to a cozy mystery group which offered me the opportunity to read a copy of this book. Since I review all books I read, today’s latest review is for The Anchor is the Key by Linda Anthony Hill. The author is new to me, but she’s written several other books before publishing this one in 2017. It might be part of a new series, but so far this is the only one. I would be interested in reading more in the future.

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In this book, we spend a few weeks with Celeste, a psychic, whose business is suddenly beginning to expand with an influx of clients. She’s meeting spirits with trouble passing over to the next world and learning someone was either murdered or forced to commit suicide. As Celeste tries to clear a business and warehouse from both evil and good ghosts, she finds herself falling for a few new guys and meeting religious people who question what she’s doing. Little does she know, someone is orchestrating a lot more of her life from a hidden position. It’s curious why she can’t figure it out on her own, but we soon learn what’s been blocking her.

At first, I was concerned about the book. It was very simple and meandered all over the place. By about 20%, it started to gel… this is the life of a psychic. It’s how we should read and understand the book. I then began to really like the format and approach. There are a few areas that were too open-ended, and the book ended with a lot of questions and areas where we are left to wonder what actually happened. If there’s an upcoming sequel, I’m good with the way this one ended. If this is the end, I’m a little unsure why it didn’t wrap things up in a better manner. It felt rushed otherwise and somewhat incomplete.

That said, I came to like the author’s style and find myself on the edge of the couch wondering what each new spirit could contribute to the on-going mystery. I like the author’s setting and Celeste is quite a character. She’s too direct to be someone I’d like in real life, but as a primary character, I enjoyed her ability to get things accomplished.

I’m curious to see where this one goes. I’d give it 3.5 stars… possibly more depending on what happens in the next book, e.g. if it becomes a series with more answered questions. Kudos to the author for creating a very interesting narrative and cast of characters.

About Me
For those new to me or my reviews… here’s the scoop: I’m Jay, an author who lives in NYC. My novels, Watching Glass Shatter and Father Figure, can be purchased on Amazon as electronic copies or physical copies. I write A LOT. I read A LOT. And now I blog A LOT. First the book review goes on Goodreads, and then I send it on over to my WordPress blog at https://thisismytruthnow.com, where you’ll find the revealing and introspective 365 Daily Challenge – words and humor. You can also find all my social media profiles to get the details on the who/what/when/where and my pictures. Leave a comment and let me know what you think. Thanks for stopping by. Note: All written content is my original creation and copyrighted to me, but the graphics and images were linked from other sites and belong to them. Many thanks to their original creators. Follow my blog with Bloglovin.

Book Review: Maledicus by Charles F. French

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History has tons of lecherous and caustic villains. Author Charles F. French re-introduced me to one in the debut novel, Maledicus: The Investigative Paranormal Society Book I, in his series ‘The Investigative Paranormal Society.’ Long ago under Roman Emperor Caligula served a man named Maledicus. Is he real or made-up? I’m not sure, but’s he scary and wicked, and I don’t ever want to meet him. Maledicus has tortured hundreds perhaps thousands, but when Caligula fears the man he once thought of as an ally, Maledicus is tricked into being killed. But he’s so horrific, the Underworld refuses to let him truly die and instead, he haunts people for thousands of years. Through an idol of sorts, his spirit is invoked and wrecks havoc on anyone nearby. Fast forward to current day and a young girl being tortured in her dreams… it wasn’t enough her entire family died under mysterious circumstances, now what’s she gonna do?

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French’s novel is a page-turner. He doesn’t just tell us the story of Maledicus. We learn the stories of several people impacted by him in the 19th and 20th centuries. We also get to know the three investigators who’ve formed a paranormal club near the end of their regular careers. We become invested in their characters, their pasts, and their suffering. We root for them to overcome what’s holding them back… and then we just want them to survive the ‘re-incarnated’ Maledicus. What a thriller! It’s a roller coaster of crazy drama across multiple historical periods. I’m certain at times we’re not really supposed to know the order in which things happened, too. But that’s okay… the plot and details are just great.

French has told a new type of scary story where sometimes we think things will turn out okay, then we’re slapped cold and quick. He’s highly imaginative and comes up with some great tortures (without being too graphically detailed). Characters are diverse and clear. Timelines are murky but that’s okay… it helps build the drama of ‘wait… what’s really going on here?’ so we can find some of the final surprises. I’ll leave it up to you to figure out what really happens in the last few chapters.

It’s the first in the series… I’m looking forward to more. Kudos to the author for writing us a chilling drama worthy of a few nail-biting moments.

 

About Me
For those new to me or my reviews… here’s the scoop: I’m Jay, an author who lives in NYC. My novels, Watching Glass Shatter and Father Figure, can be purchased on Amazon as electronic copies or physical copies. I write A LOT. I read A LOT. And now I blog A LOT. First the book review goes on Goodreads, and then I send it on over to my WordPress blog at https://thisismytruthnow.com, where you’ll find the revealing and introspective 365 Daily Challenge – words and humor. You can also find all my social media profiles to get the details on the who/what/when/where and my pictures. Leave a comment and let me know what you think. Thanks for stopping by. Note: All written content is my original creation and copyrighted to me, but the graphics and images were linked from other sites and belong to them. Many thanks to their original creators. Follow my blog with Bloglovin.

Book Review: The Bride of Glass by Candace Robinson

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Earlier this year, I read and adored Candace Robinson‘s first book in the Glass Vault series. When the author’s second book, The Bride of Glass, was published this summer, I had to jump on it. What imagination and creativity lurks in her mind!

glass

Combining fantasies and fairy tales, this series expands upon everything we thought we knew about the stories of yesteryear and injects them with a twisty punch. Perrie is stuck in Quinsey Wolfe’s crazy glass vault, but she’s no longer Perrie. He’s transformed his bride into something very different, yet memories surface and push her to figure out the truth. Vale keeps a strong hold on her, but her friends are very persistent. Will she be rescued? Will he go back to the underworld? What happens to their strange and addictive love?

What I loved the most about this book was learning the back stories of all the characters who’ve been previously turned into storybook characters… from Little Red Riding Hood to Jack the Ripper, we now understand how Vale transported them into his frozen world, and how they can be turned into glass. The most fantastic part is Vale’s history… who his parents are, what happened to him as a child, and what he really wants from life.

Robinson has built a stellar cast with strong appeal. We root for the bad guys to turn good, yet we dislike some of the things some must to do get there. The world is grey… not black and white. It’s a nice gut punch of passion and fear. To be in her mind while creating this would be quite comical and inspiring. It’s such an easy-reading style full of imagery and thought-provoking concepts. I definitely look forward to reading more from her… this was my third book and I’m sure they will continue to amaze and entertain me. Thanks for this great series… perhaps one day, there could be a third Quinsey Wolfe installment?

 

About Me
For those new to me or my reviews… here’s the scoop: I’m Jay, an author who lives in NYC. My novels, Watching Glass Shatter and Father Figure, can be purchased on Amazon as electronic copies or physical copies. I write A LOT. I read A LOT. And now I blog A LOT. First the book review goes on Goodreads, and then I send it on over to my WordPress blog at https://thisismytruthnow.com, where you’ll find the revealing and introspective 365 Daily Challenge – words and humor. You can also find all my social media profiles to get the details on the who/what/when/where and my pictures. Leave a comment and let me know what you think. Thanks for stopping by. Note: All written content is my original creation and copyrighted to me, but the graphics and images were linked from other sites and belong to them. Many thanks to their original creators. Follow my blog with Bloglovin.

Book Review: Heir of Ashes by Jina S. Bazzar

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After interacting with Jina S. Bazzar via her blog for over a year, I decided to read her short story, The Curse earlier this year. I enjoyed it a lot even though I’m not a heavy fantasy reader. I added the first book in her series, Heir of Ashes, to my summer reading queue and finished it last week. All I can say is her heroine, Roxanne Fosch, is quite a captivating bad ass!

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For starters, the book is about 9k Kindle lines which is somewhere around 700 pages if I did the math properly. It was a daunting task, but by the time I finished it, I couldn’t believe it had gone so quickly. That’s a good sign when an author who can truly immerse you in a fantasy world full of awesome scenery and characters. If I tried to count the number of fight scenes, I’d run out of hands and toes! But each one felt different… between the multiple groups or assassins trying to get hold of her and the people she was trying to track down, Roxanne had tons of challenges to deal with. Along the way, Bazzar weaves in some romance, mystery, advice, and charm. It hits a bunch of happy spots when I’m looking for a well-written, cross-genre-style novel.

One of the most remarkable items the book left me with was how in Roxanne’s journey across those few days/weeks when we caught a sneak peak into her life, very little changed — and I mean this in a good way. She set out to escape, which happens. She set out to get revenge, which happens. She set out to discover who she was, which happens. But in the end, she’s basically back to the beginning not really knowing who she is anymore, trapped by a new force, and ready for revenge on the true tormentors. Book 2 will definitely handle all that drama and more, I’m sure, but in the meantime… so many questions about the different species and creatures in this world are still teasing me. Are her parents really dead? Was the curse from the original short story/prequel truly fulfilled? Why is this all happening? When will we meet the queen and her sister? How can I make Logan real?

I find myself intrigued and excited to learn more. I’d give this story 4.5 stars (rounding up where appropriate) and congratulate the author and publishing team on a successful launch. I look forward to picking up the next book in the series when it’s ready for publication.

About Me
For those new to me or my reviews… here’s the scoop: I’m Jay, an author who lives in NYC. My novels, Watching Glass Shatter and Father Figure, can be purchased on Amazon as electronic copies or physical copies. I write A LOT. I read A LOT. And now I blog A LOT. First the book review goes on Goodreads, and then I send it on over to my WordPress blog at https://thisismytruthnow.com, where you’ll find the revealing and introspective 365 Daily Challenge – words and humor. You can also find all my social media profiles to get the details on the who/what/when/where and my pictures. Leave a comment and let me know what you think. Thanks for stopping by. Note: All written content is my original creation and copyrighted to me, but the graphics and images were linked from other sites and belong to them. Many thanks to their original creators. Follow my blog with Bloglovin.