Tags

TAG: Where in the world are you? USA / NY / NYC / Midtown East

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What is the “Where in the World Are You Tag?”

Where in the world is the author of that great blog?  Hopefully, this tag will help answer that question and provide some background info about the locales behind the blogs we love.

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My blog “ThisIsMyTruthNow” can be reached here. And I live in Midtown East / NYC / USA. See below for two pictures of the area in the city.

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Nominations:

You are ALL nominated.  The best part is that it is super quick and easy.

The goal is to get as many blogs involved as possible.  Using the hashtag #WhereIntheWorldAreYou? will make it easy to find new blogs from interesting places.

 

The rules are simple

1. Share your location being as specific as you like.  Just a country is fine.

2. If you wish, give a little info on your locality.  Photos are a plus!

3. If you have a post about where you live, feel free to share the link.

4. Add the hashtag #WhereIntheWorldAreYou?

5. Post the tag to your blog replacing the country name after the title with yours.

That’s it.  Only one question to answer and an optional essay.  Just replace the info in your predecessor’s post with your own and set it free.

 

Where did I see this tag?

From mainepaperpusher from Cornville.  Cornville is a tiny town in central Maine which is at the tippy top right corner of the United States, near Canada.
Cornville is a very rural town with no stores, restaurants or even a post office.  The population is about 1200, and there is no center of town at all.  Basically, if you blink you’ll drive right through it without even knowing it.  You might do that even if you don’t blink! If you want to know more about Cornville and see some photos, feel free to visit my guest post on Mohamad Al Karbi’s excellent blog here:  The Town at the End of the Universe. Thanks to all for participating!  ~mainepaperpusher  Everyone Else Has the Best Titles
#WhereIntheWorldAreYou?

 

About Me

I’m Jay and I live in NYC. By profession, I work in technology. By passion, I work in writing. Once you hit my site “ThisIsMyTruthNow” at https://thisismytruthnow.com, you can join the fun and see my blog and various site content. You’ll find book reviews, published and in-progress fiction, TV/Film reviews, favorite vacation spots and my own version of the “365 Daily Challenge.” Since March 13, 2017, I’ve posted a characteristic either I currently embody or one I’d like to embody in the future. 365 days of reflection to discover who I am and what I want out of life… see how you compare! Each month, I will post a summary of a trip I’ve taken somewhere in the world. I’ll cover the transportation, hotel, restaurants, activities, who, what, when, where and why… and let you decide for yourself if it’s a trip worth taking. Feel free to like, rate, comment or take the poll for each post. Tell me what you think. Note: All content is my original creation and copyrighted to me, but the graphics and images were linked from other sites and belong to them. Many thanks to their original creators.

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Top Reads – Age 18 to 29 – Historical Fiction

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As part of our series with curiosity brewing over how people choose to read what book at which age, it’s time to put forth some recommendations for the second week… and our focus will be ages 18 to 29 for Historical Fiction:

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Of course, everyone has a different maturity level and might be ready to read certain books sooner than others, as well as vice versa. It’s only meant as general guidelines with a fun spirit — and not any sense of indicating someone isn’t capable of reading something sooner. I’ve linked to my review of the book for any that I’ve read. There are a few I haven’t yet read, and so I’ve linked to its Goodreads book page.

I am also using a more strict interpretation of the the historical fiction genre than commonly understood. For my selections, a few rules:

(1) Book must have been written and/or published at least 25 years after the events in the book actually take place, e.g. written in 1990, the events had to occur before 1965 (basically 1 previous generation).

(2) Its genre needs to be primarily known as historical fiction. A few selections below contain some fantasy or mystery, but that’s a minor component. Just because a book takes place long ago in the past, doesn’t make it historical fiction. I toyed with including Charles Dickens’ “A Tale of Two Cities,” but decided that belongs in another Top Reads list, e.g. Classics (Pre-20th Century).

(3) The primary characters need to be fictional or, if they are based on real people, they have to be used only as a foundation from which the author jumps off. For this reason, I didn’t include the book “Victoria” by Daisy Goodwin, although I love it. “Victoria” is based on reality, using verified letters the Queen wrote to family and friends — very little of the book is completely fictional.

Many of these books could be read at any age. I tried to ignore ones that are taught in high school, thus why I started at the age of 18. I wanted to include “The Color Purple,” but I think that’s better when read in your 30s, so it will be on a future list. But maybe you think it should be in one’s 20s. Convince me!

My suggestions are based on some of the content in the books, the written words / level of the language, and/or readers having enough life experience to truly understand what messages are being conveyed. That said, it’s only my best guess and I am very open to hearing different opinions… possibly persuaded to make a change. I also know I missed a few good ones, but I can include them for future years. Let’s have a really great discussion over all these items!

 

Age / Book / Author

  • Age 18: The Crucible by Arthur Miller
    • Throughout high school, you’re often forced to read certain classic literary novels and plays. This play is right on the border of classic vs. historical fiction, high school vs. college read, and forced vs. exploratory/enjoyable about a dark American period. I’ve decided this is a good transition piece to move readers into the genre, showing true history of what’s happened in America, as well as fictional characters who are over-the-top and on a crusader-type mission. Though some may find it a tad boring, I think it’s got elements of everything that represent historical fiction with a great respect. It would be a great one to read, watch a television version and then even see a play in a local theatre.

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  • Age 19: The Book Thief by Marcus Zusak
    • Arguably part of the Young Adult (YA) section, and perhaps even something to read at a younger age, I would tell readers to hold off until you’re out of high school. Get away from the clique and group sociology. Make your decisions on if you’re going to college, trade school or starting a job. Then settle in one weekend with this book to see how hard life was for other people, as a youngster in the face of a horrific period in history. You’ve learned enough about the Holocaust in school, and sometimes it’s more than any single person can handle hearing. But this book transformed me and moved me to tears. And it’s great for those who love books about books. It’s a “let’s change our life” book, perfect for when you begin your foray post school into whatever path you choose for life.

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  • Age 20: Moloka’i by Alan Brennert
    • Not as well known as The Book Thief, but just as powerful. Few know about this tragedy faced in Hawaii, as an example (since it happened elsewhere too), over a century ago. People are afraid of disease and things that look different than they do. Learning how life changes for these characters over a 30 to 40 year period, understanding the lessons we experience when we’re older versus what we should have known in the beginning can be a game-changer. This tale has a beautiful connection with the characters, where you will love them and be annoyed with a few of them, all at the same time. Few stories take you to a time and place like this one, where things are different yet still so very much the same. Perfect for strting a new decade of your life.

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  • Age 21: Orphan Train by Christine Baker Kline
    • There’s a balance in this book that I’ve not yet found in another. Told both in the current time period and in the past, it’s not only a coming-of-age story for someone who needs to learn how to grow up, it’s also a reflection on a life left behind for a woman near the end of her days. But when they bond, you see something special. Though one of the characters is in her teens, I would suggest holding off until you are embracing life in your 20s… when seeing your grandparents facing issues, looking to connect with their grandchildren, and feeling a sense of story-telling time. And when your mind will be open to accept that the things in this book actually did happen many years ago.

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  • Age 22: Memoirs of a Geisha by Arthur Golden
    • A tough add for me. I considered “Peony in Love” by Lisa See, or one of her other books; but I stuck with this one. Hearing about a heritage other than American, or Anglo, is important. Knowing what women went thru to be able to survive. It’s something you can take a lesson from at any age, but I think one’s mind is open after finishing college (or a few years of work) — having a few years of reading on your own, having chosen fiction that you can connect with each day. Now you have an opportunity to travel to a land on the other side of the world — or maybe close by, if you live in Asia — where feminism and the female voice are treated so very differently.

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  • Age 23: Girl with Pearl Earring by Tracy Chevalier
    • I’ve never read this one, but I know it’s powerful. And important. I’ve read excerpts. I’ve seen some adaptions. The narrator is 16. But 16 in the 1600s is more like a girl in her 20s now-a-days, I believe. Reading it when you’re either settling down into “married life” or your own career, seeing the differences from so many centuries ago… might help give some perspective to where you are in your own life — and what you want to accomplish. And you’ll know more about this genre, including what historical periods and countries you like and don’t like.

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  • Age 24: The Lady of the Rivers by Philippa Gregory
    • I adore Philippa Gregory’s books and the details on all the English Kings and Queens. I picked this one, though it’s not my favorite, because it’s the debut for the book series about the Plantagenet and Tudor royal families. For most people, it was torture hearing about the royal families… who killed who and who fathered who. People failed quizzes and got their Henrys, Richards and Georges confused all the time. {Maybe not us book nerds… I never did, I loved them}. But it feels like in your mid-20s, you’re starting to want to hear the other side of the facts. What happened behind the scenes? And now with so many TV adaptions of these periods, it’s important to understand how it all began.

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  • Age 25: The Help by Kathryn Stockett
    • Historical fiction wouldn’t be a genre if it didn’t include a story about civil rights and the struggle for equality. It is such an important part of American culture, and we’ve studied so much of it in school. But what about the real people who went through it. The men and women who dealt with the violence and mistreatment on a daily basis. And if you add some humor, passion and familiar connection, in a setting more beautiful than you hear about in school, you’ve got a winner. Another book worth waiting until you’ve finished school and had a few years away from the required reads, studying and quizzes. Some may argue this could be used during school as a way to teach, but it has so many wonderful elements, I’d rather wait until it feels like a natural go-to read to learn about the things we all know happened but have limited experience with. {Plus, if you read it too young, I could see some unruly youngster baking their own chocolate pies for people they dislike! And no, I wouldn’t have been one of them! How dare you… LOL}

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  • Age 26: The Forgotten Garden by Kate Morton
    • This is one of my top five favorite books and Morton is one of my top four favorite authors. Her language is ethereal. Her scenes are breathtaking. Her characters remind us of people we know. You need some life experience before taking on her books. If you’ve had these types of life experiences before 25, good for you. But there’s heartbreak. And pain. And torture. And longing. And it takes years to build that up. I probably should push this until later 20s or early 30s, but I want everyone to be exposed to this author as early as possible without causing any sort of concerns at too early of an age that you are bored by lengthy descriptions. And the lessons I learned about life and people… absolutely phenomenal.

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  • Age 27: Outlander by Diana Gabaldon
    • Another one where I picked the first in series. And I pushed this towards the end of the 20s purely due to some of the violent content surrounding war, sex and pain. I am ignoring the small component of time travel and fantasy as that’s not the point of the story. The point is being torn between two places, two time periods, and the love you feel for a man who is your destiny but also your potential downfall. I want to read this over and over again, but there are so many in the series, you have to start relatively young to get to them all!

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  • Age 28: The Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follett
    • It’s a toss-up for me whether Follett or Morton are the best historical fiction writers in the entire universe. It was also very difficult to just pick one of his books. “World Without End” is my favorite in this series. “Night Over Water” is my ultimate favorite of all his works. Both are also historical fiction. And while I like the setting of Night over Water, it could have taken place in any time period… so I opted for Pillars. The imagination here is intense. The ability to draw so many facets of personalities, as well as the complexities among the different generations over the years is immense. The man’s a genius and his literature is so impacting, I truly set aside uninterrupted time when it’s a Follett novel. Given the vast diversity of the historical periods being covered, it’s meant for a mature reader. Some are ready to tackle this in their late teens or early twenties. And I mean no offense, but I think it’s a better read when you’re older, and you’ve read enough in this particular genre and by this author… so when you pick up this series of books, your amazement will be profound. {Tell me why I’m wrong — totally up for it}

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  • Age 29: Like Water for Chocolate by Laura Esquivel
    • Similar to last week’s mystery choice with Dan Brown, I’m gonna get a little flack for throwing this one in here. But I adore it. The messages in this story. The characters. The loss. The pain. The love. The images. It is so beautiful and it could only take place in the past in another country (other than my own) where life seems so much more cultural and rich. Another book that requires having had a great loss, I’d save this one for later in the 20s. Actually, I’d read it twice. Once in your 20s and again in your mid to late 40s… there’s a different mindset, and you’ll have a different perspective. I can say that from talking to other people about it, as I haven’t quite reached the second age yet, so… that’s where you can slap me around a bit, telling me I should have included “The Color Purple” by Alice Walker. I can take it. Hit me.

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Summary

I know I’ve got 1 or 2 wrong… still debating… but if you know anything about me in my 365 Daily Posts — I aim for perfection, don’t get caught up in the vicious circle of analysis paralysis, and I’m constantly in my head thinking too much. So this represents a two-hour research and release process about recommendations for historical fiction in your 20s. OK! Let’s rumble… who agrees? Who disagrees?  Where did I forget something? Keep me focused, friends!

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 Rules If You Want to Do One Too

  1. Pick a genre. You can get very detailed and go into sub-genres, e.g. cozy, classic, etc. I’m starting general and may work my way down into the details.
  2. Pick an age range, roughly covering 12 years. You can add more or start with less, but I figured twelve ages seemed like a good one to start with.
  3. Pick a book for each age that you’d recommend to get someone situated with the genre.
  4. You can’t repeat an author within that age range.
  5. Explain why that author, book and age.
  6. Either show a book cover or provide a link to the book on Goodreads, or if you’ve read it and have a review, link your review.
  7. Start a discussion with everyone, e.g. is it the right age, is something missing…
  8. Tag others if you’d like, but I open it to everyone.
  9. Last week was mystery fiction for ages 13 to 24. See the post here.
  10. I don’t read in all genres. I don’t know every age. I’d love some help. Anyone want to partner with me on this for a different age range and genre? Please!

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About Me

I’m Jay and I live in NYC. By profession, I work in technology. By passion, I work in writing. Once you hit my site “ThisIsMyTruthNow” at https://thisismytruthnow.com, you can join the fun and see my blog and various site content. You’ll find book reviews, published and in-progress fiction, TV/Film reviews, favorite vacation spots and my own version of the “365 Daily Challenge.” Since March 13, 2017, I’ve posted a characteristic either I currently embody or one I’d like to embody in the future. 365 days of reflection to discover who I am and what I want out of life… see how you compare! Feel free to like, rate, comment or take the poll for each post. Tell me what you think. Note: All content is my original creation and copyrighted to me, but the graphics and images were linked from other sites and belong to them. Many thanks to their original creators.

TAG: Would You Rather – Books

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Thank you to Sheri at  for tagging me in the “Would you rather?” book tag. I enjoy getting to know people via these tags, and you should look at Sheri’s site. It’s full of TV, books and movies… it’s organized really well, pretty to look at and has lots of fun content. Check out this post of hers… you might like the pics! 😛

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Would you rather…

Have an unlimited money for Ebooks, or a 5,000 dollar B&N giftcard?

Unlimited money for eBooks. While I prefer reading a physical book, I could ignore that if I had unlimited funds for online purchases… right? My reading thirst is unquenchable.

Meet any deceased poet, or J.K. Rowling?

I love poetry, but I’d rather meet Ms. Rowling… to talk about her imagination, struggles, recommendations… to hear funny stories about publishing and her characters… to see the things she regrets.

Write the world’s most famous book, or visit the world of your favorite book for one day?

Easy. Write the world’s most famous book… Because I have too many favorite books with amazing worlds to choose from. I couldn’t just pick one.

Choose Morelli or Ranger?  (Insert characters from your favorite fictional love triangle.)

Yikes…. this could be a lot of people, but there seem to only be two with triangles I can vividly recall at the moment… Hannah Swensen needs to choose between Mike and Norman in Joanne Fluke’s Lake Eden series, and eventually a third person enters the picture to complicate it even more from what I understand; I’m a few books behind. Stephanie has to choose between Ranger and Joe Morelli in Janet Evanovich’s Stephanie Plum bounty hunter series. Ranger represents danger, darkness and wild. I’d have to go with Ranger on this one. I’m so quiet and normal, I need danger to shock my system every so often.

Experience Hogwarts in a very realistic and accurate virtual reality, or travel around the world for a year, at no cost.

Oh… tough, but easy at the same time. I love Harry Potter, but I’d be so disappointed to give it up after the realistic experience. If it were forever, I’d choose Harry Potter. If it were temporary, then I’d have to go with the year-long travel opportunity at no cost, assuming I could pick the locations and accommodations. If someone else is picking them, and I might not get such great places, then I’d be back to Harry Potter. See why it’s so tough???

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I Tag:

Absolutely everyone on my follower list. I want to see all the answers. I am greedy today. I may have to add some questions to this list next time… I’ve got a few interesting ones to share at some point!

 

About Me

I’m Jay and I live in NYC. By profession, I work in technology. By passion, I work in writing. Once you hit my site “ThisIsMyTruthNow” at https://thisismytruthnow.com, you can join the fun and see my blog and various site content. You’ll find book reviews, published and in-progress fiction, TV/Film reviews, favorite vacation spots and my own version of the “365 Daily Challenge.” Since March 13, 2017, I’ve posted a characteristic either I currently embody or one I’d like to embody in the future. 365 days of reflection to discover who I am and what I want out of life… see how you compare! Each month, I will post a summary of a trip I’ve taken somewhere in the world. I’ll cover the transportation, hotel, restaurants, activities, who, what, when, where and why… and let you decide for yourself if it’s a trip worth taking. Feel free to like, rate, comment or take the poll for each post. Tell me what you think. Note: All content is my original creation and copyrighted to me, but the graphics and images were linked from other sites and belong to them. Many thanks to their original creators.

TAG: This Is My Genre Tell Me Yours Book

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I want to thank Misty at mistysbookspace for tagging me to participate in the “This Is My Genre Tell Me Yours” book tag. It’s a great way to share your love of a whole new area of books for someone else to love. And Misty’s got a great blog full of reviews, author info and book tours — great stuff beyond the normal book review!

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Here are the rules:

  • Credit Drew @ TheTattooedBookGeek as the creator of the tag, use the created tag name graphic and link back to his blog. (Also, if you want to learn more about the tag you can see Drew’s post HERE.) He’s also got a fantastic site… lots of humor and valuable insights into life.
  • Answer the questions.
  • Tag as many people as you want.

And now comes the fun part, the questions!

1. What is your favorite genre?

It’s a toss-up between mystery / thriller / suspense. And all three are slightly different. What’s a book junkie to do??? MYSTERY!

2. Who is your favorite author from the genre?

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Agatha Christie wrote hundreds of mystery and suspense short stories, novellas and novels, containing multiple crime solving detectives all over the world She’s highly imaginative, quite clever and a fantastic character developer.

3. What is it about the genre that keeps pulling you back?

Life can be dull and boring. You may get busy or deal with some weird people who do silly things, but very few of us are ever involved in a murder mystery. In a mystery, you can play so many roles: victim, killer, witness, suspect or detective. It offers you something different from normal life, a way to use your brain for deep analysis and clue-solving. You have wild characters, intense plots and beautiful settings. You get red herrings and direct motives. You always have something to keep your mind guessing and enjoying what you read.

4. What is the book that started your love for the genre?

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Agatha Christie’s “And Then There Were None.” You can see my review here.

5. If you had to recommend at least one book from your favorite genre to a non-reader/ someone looking to start reading that genre, what book would you choose and why?

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Agatha Christie’s novella “Murder on the Orient Express.” See my review here. It’s a mystery that will perplex you and help you find something you never knew you were missing. It may be nearly a century old, but it’s still so very complex and mysterious.

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For those who need something more current or a bit more thriller and dark, I’d go with Patricia Cornwell’s “Postmortem.” See my review here.

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For those who want a modern almost cozy mystery, I’d choose Sue Grafton’s “A is for Alibi.”

6. Why do you read?

To visit places I’ve never been before. To do things I can’t do in person. To meet people I find interesting. To take a break from every day boring and mundane happenstance. To exercise my creative mind by building images, actions and emotions in my head, despite only reading words on a page.

I’m Tagging:

Kristin

erinthedreamer

Sophie @ Blame Chocolate

alwaystrustinbooks

Nashra Usmani

Mischenko

If you don’t want to do this feel free to just ignore it. If you want to do it but weren’t listed, you should. I picked the last 6 people I interacted with on WordPress. Thanks for reading!

 

About Me

I’m Jay and I live in NYC. By profession, I work in technology. By passion, I work in writing. Once you hit my site “ThisIsMyTruthNow” at https://thisismytruthnow.com, you can join the fun and see my blog and various site content. You’ll find book reviews, published and in-progress fiction, TV/Film reviews, favorite vacation spots and my own version of the “365 Daily Challenge.” Since March 13, 2017, I’ve posted a characteristic either I currently embody or one I’d like to embody in the future. 365 days of reflection to discover who I am and what I want out of life… see how you compare! Each month, I will post a summary of a trip I’ve taken somewhere in the world. I’ll cover the transportation, hotel, restaurants, activities, who, what, when, where and why… and let you decide for yourself if it’s a trip worth taking. Feel free to like, rate, comment or take the poll for each post. Tell me what you think. Note: All content is my original creation and copyrighted to me, but the graphics and images were linked from other sites and belong to them. Many thanks to their original creators.

 

TAG: Goodreads Books #2

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Thank you to Susan @ SusanLovesBooks for tagging me on the Goodreads Book Tag. Everyone should take a look at her site, as its full of great book reviews… current books, blasts from the past and a little bit of every genre. Good stuff! Here we go…

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WHAT WAS THE LAST BOOK YOU MARKED AS ‘READ’?

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It was a good read, full of horror and gore. But it should have been better. My review can be seen here.

WHAT ARE YOU CURRENTLY READING?

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“Midnight at the Bright Ideas Bookstore” is a NetGalley award and I am 50% through. Good so far. “Dead with the Wind” is the second book in a cozy mystery series by a great author.

WHAT WAS THE LAST BOOK YOU MARKED AS TBR?

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I saw it on someone else’s Goodreads profile and it looked fantastic. What if we chose our partner based on DNA? Scary…

WHAT BOOK DO YOU PLAN TO READ NEXT?

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It’s the next book to be published from the NetGalley awards I’ve won. Review due in 2 weeks!

DO YOU USE THE STAR RATING SYSTEM?

Yes! I first rate the book on Goodreads using the 1 to 5 scale, and then I transfer them here to WordPress. The star definitions are:

5: Fantastic, a must check out for this genre. Changed how I think or made me incredibly happy to have known this work and I will tell everyone about it. Top-notch!

4: Extremely good and held my attention throughout. I connected with the story, want to experience more from the author/director/actor and will remember it well.

3: The all-around good work that had some strengths but also had some weaknesses. I’d recommend it to a friend but with a bit of caution.

2: Not of interest, missing major standards in either character, plot, theme, consistency, etc. Lost my interest way too many times.

1: Not even sure how this got published; how and why did I choose this work?

*My ratings scale considers the genre of the work meaning I could give a 5 to both a cozy and a famed traditional fiction novel or a cozy mystery. I interpret this to mean both are top notch in their genre, but it doesn’t imply that I think that a fun short mystery read is the same caliber as a Shakespearean play or classic coming of age work. Both can be incredibly good but are important for very different reasons.

ARE YOU DOING A 2017 READING CHALLENGE?

Yes! It’s on my Home Page… 104 book. 2 books for every week. I’m currently at 49 books, which is about 9 ahead of schedule. I hope I can keep it up! See it here.

DO YOU HAVE A WISHLIST?

Sort of. I have a few books I’ve added on Amazon. I have a few items I’ve submitted requests for on NetGalley. And I recently started my “Book Bucket List.” Check the post out by clicking here. It has 12 books (one per month for a year) that I hope to read… then add a new one as each month passes.

WHAT BOOK DO YOU PLAN TO BUY NEXT?

I just placed an order today for 4 books

  • Three in a few cozy mystery series that I enjoy by Jenn McKinlay

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  • Buddy Read book with Medhat, who you can see here.

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DO YOU HAVE ANY FAVORITE QUOTES? SHARE A FEW.

“Good friends, good books, and a sleepy conscience: this is the ideal life.”
Mark Twain

“After all, reading is arguably a far more creative and imaginative process than writing; when the reader creates emotion in their head, or the colors of the sky during the setting sun, or the smell of a warm summer’s breeze on their face, they should reserve as much praise for themselves as they do for the writer – perhaps more.”
Jasper Fforde, The Well of Lost Plots

“Persuasion is not about force; it’s about showing a person a door, and making him or her desperate to open it.”
David Mitchell, The Bone Clocks

“A life well lived is a life full of decisions.”
Guess

WHO ARE YOUR FAVORITE AUTHORS?

Oh no! I could go on forever… but right now, I have 4 primary favorites:

  • Agatha Christie
  • Kate Morton
  • Ken Follett
  • Henry James

HAVE YOU JOINED ANY GROUPS?

I have a few on Goodreads and Facebook, but I get so busy chatting with friends, I forget to check them or post in them. Do you have any good ones? I’d like to join a few new ones.

I TAG:

EVERYONE on my follower list. YES, that means YOU if you are reading this. I want to know all about your read habits and favorites.

I love fun little get-to-know-the-reader tags, where you find a bunch of new books, authors and tools. Happy Blogging!

About Me

I’m Jay and I live in NYC. By profession, I work in technology. By passion, I work in writing. Once you hit my site “ThisIsMyTruthNow” at https://thisismytruthnow.com, you can join the fun and see my blog and various site content. You’ll find book reviews, published and in-progress fiction, TV/Film reviews, favorite vacation spots and my own version of the “365 Daily Challenge.” Since March 13, 2017, I’ve posted a characteristic either I currently embody or one I’d like to embody in the future. 365 days of reflection to discover who I am and what I want out of life… see how you compare! Each month, I will post a summary of a trip I’ve taken somewhere in the world. Feel free to like, rate, comment or take the poll for each post. Tell me what you think. Note: All content is my original creation and copyrighted to me, but the graphics and images were linked from other sites and belong to them. Many thanks to their original creators.

Top Reads – Age 13 to 24 – Mystery

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Now that I’ve been blogging about books and writing a review for everything I’ve ever read, curiosity brewed over how people choose to read what book at which age, especially when they are younger and getting familiar with different genres. With so many genres out there and so many places to look for books, I thought I’d put together my own list of when I would recommend choosing a certain book.

Of course, everyone has a different maturity level and might be ready to read certain books sooner than others, as well as vice versa. It’s only meant as general guidelines with a fun spirit — and not any sense of indicating someone isn’t capable of reading something sooner. Since mystery fiction is my favorite genre, I am starting here with the best age to start reading a mystery… and it was not easy… there are so many to choose from! I tried to pick classics to show different styles, but also have a few more current ones. Maybe it should be a “3 per age” with a vote in the future…

Rules

  1. Pick a genre. You can get very detailed and go into sub-genres, e.g. cozy, classic, etc. I’m starting general and may work my way down into the details.
  2. Pick an age range, roughly covering 12 years. You can add more or start with less, but I figured twelve ages seemed like a good one to start with.
  3. Pick a book for each age that you’d recommend to get someone situated with the genre.
  4. You can’t repeat an author within that age range.
  5. Explain why that author, book and age.
  6. Either show a book cover or provide a link to the book on Goodreads, or if you’ve read it and have a review, link your review.
  7. Start a discussion with everyone, e.g. is it the right age, is something missing…
  8. Tag others if you’d like, but I open it to everyone.

Age / Book / Author

  • Age 13: The Tower Treasure with the Hardy Boys by Franklin Dixon
    • The introduction should start with something where someone young is doing the investigating, as it will help build the connection between the reader and the investigators in a book. This one offers a good, clean introduction to the world of mystery.
  • Age 14: The Secret of the Old Clock with Nancy Drew by Carolyn Keene
    • It’s only fair that if you have a team of boy investigators, you also need to have a girl investigator. I put the Hardy Boys first only because it was a family doing the investigating… now it’s time to branch out on your own and understand things from the opposite perspective.
  • Age 15: The Legend of Sleepy Hollow by Washington Irving
    • Once you’ve got the basics under your belt, let’s add a mystery that adds the fear without being too overwhelming. And if you’re gonna read in this genre, you need to learn all about the potential for ghosts and the after-life.
  • Age 16: Flowers in the Attic by V.C. Andrews
    • Families keep secrets. But that’s not the first thing you should learn. Once you start investigating, you need to understand what happens when you don’t even realize there is a mystery going on until far too late… plus there are a few touchy topics (incest, poison) that probably require a bit older of an audience.
  • Age 17: The Murders in the Rue Morgue by Edgar Allan Poe
    •  The master needs to be incorporated, as well as the true intentions of a murder. A true mystery, an introduction to the concept of a morgue and where dead bodies go for an autopsy… the stage is set for horror to grow from here, too. It’ll help you determine if you like a little bit of gothic gore or you want to stay far away from it.
  • Age 18: And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie
    • The Queen of the mystery is perfect right as you’re graduating from high school. When you’ve got 10 potential killers all locked on a single island with no escape, you need to learn how to deduce the killer before you are killed yourself. You survived high school but now you’ve got a world to conquer without a real sense of who to trust.
  • Age 19: The Turn of the Screw by Henry James
    • Many don’t think of Henry James as a mystery writer, but he’s a classic, and often taught in first year English college courses. This one takes the leap into the psychological aspects of a family wondering if there is a ghost or if someone is just playing games. At 19, you need to be careful who you allow yourself to be around, especially when you go out on your own… time to learn some lessons here about “what you see isn’t always what you get.”
  • Age 20: The Maltese Falcon by Dashiell Hammett
    • Ah, the classics. Before 20, you’re often not very interested in anything that’s nearly a century old.  This isn’t always true, but for folks just getting introduced to the genre or even reading, it likely could be accurate. Yes, many of the others on the list are fairly old, but this one is one of the earliest introductions to the <i>classic</i> private investigator of the 1930s, where the format and formulas were established and the movies were in the Golden Age of mystery. It’s great to kick back and read a classic one weekend when you don’t want to focus on your job or studies.
  • Age 21: Who’s Body? by Dorothy Sayers
    • Now that you’ve read the hardcore PI style with Hammett, take a gander at the counterpart with the British version of the classic detective. Plus you have an opportunity to to learn more about the concept of body doubles, perception and the art of throwing off red herring clues. With a focus on British government, structure and the slightly cozy direction, you’ll know if you want to stay this route or go a little more dark. Plus, once you can legally drink, this one may just push you there a little bit sooner.
  • Age 22: A Study in Scarlet with Sherlock Holmes by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
    • Another fine classic, possibly something you should watch even younger, but I’ve saved it for the early 20s when you’re mind is sharper, you’ve had some solid reading under your belt and it’s time to decide if you’re ready for a true series with multiple film adaptions or you’re more of a solid single stand-alone mystery. Having dual sleuths is an important introduction, too, as well as the art of the foil when you “meet” Moriarty.
  • Age 23: Rebecca by Daphne DuMaurier
    • The truest form of a psychological mystery at nearly 100 years old. You’ve had a few of these ghostly books under your belt by now, but this one will truly ignite a passion for how a mystery book is narrated. Do you want first or third person? Do you know who the narrator is? Is he or she reliable? You’ll determine if you want to continue down the fantasy and sci-fi mystery realm, or look towards the cozy or the thriller suspense.
  • Age 24: Angels & Demons by Dan Brown
    • And when you choose the thriller and suspense route, I can think of none better than something you can relate to… we all have a good and bad side to us, but which will win out? And though Brown’s works are more fun-reads, rather than a true-to-form traditional investigator solving crimes, it’s the introduction you need to the fast-paced, page-turning read you won’t be able to put down. And then you’re ready to head into formal “adulthood” with the next step of books that will rock your mid 20s to your mid 30s.

myster

About Me

I’m Jay and I live in NYC. By profession, I work in technology. By passion, I work in writing. Once you hit my site “ThisIsMyTruthNow” at https://thisismytruthnow.com, you can join the fun and see my blog and various site content. You’ll find book reviews, published and in-progress fiction, TV/Film reviews, favorite vacation spots and my own version of the “365 Daily Challenge.” Since March 13, 2017, I’ve posted a characteristic either I currently embody or one I’d like to embody in the future. 365 days of reflection to discover who I am and what I want out of life… see how you compare! Feel free to like, rate, comment or take the poll for each post. Tell me what you think. Note: All content is my original creation and copyrighted to me, but the graphics and images were linked from other sites and belong to them. Many thanks to their original creators.

TAG: Celebrating the Little Things & 300 Followers (Combination)

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I found the “Celebrating the Little Things” tag through my online friend Misty on her site at mistysbookspace.  She had great answers and is a cool blogger, so please check out her site. I thought it was a fun idea, but then I also realized I had 300 WordPress followers earlier today… so I’m combining them together and sharing my answers to the questions.

celbrate300.jpg

1.) Who was your first follower? Tag them and give them a shout out.

My first follower was Cristian. His blog has content on almost every topic and has thousands of followers. A definite good guy to know who interacts with everyone on his blog. Go check out the link to his site.

2.) What was the last milestone you reached?

I noticed this morning that I had 300 followers over night. I also had my highest day yesterday in terms of views and likes. It’s a surprising and big celebration this week!

3.) What was the very first post you posted on your blog? Share it with us, if you can find it out!

My first blog was neither a book review nor a random blog post; it was an introduction to the book I am currently in review on with an agent. You can read the post and the overview of the book here: Watching a Glass Shatter

4.) Who was your most recent follower? Tag them and give them a shout out.

My most recent follower was earlier today. His name is Erik and has a great site called PastDueBookReview. I found 3 reviews within the first few minutes that I immediately read.

5.) What was the last post you posted and who was the first person who took their time to click the like button? Give them a shout out.

I wrote a short book review on Mockingjay, the third book in The Hunger Games trilogy by Suzanne Collins.  Claire at BrizzleLassBooks was the first person to like the post. We met about a month ago and have had several great online comments and exchanges about books and blogging. I highly recommend checking out her site.

6.) How many months have you been blogging?

I created the blog last summer and had my first post in August of 2016, which puts me just shy of the 9 month mark. I didn’t do too much those first two months, but started actively blogging in October of 2016.

7.) Do you have any bloggers you’re friends with? Give them a shout out!

I have not yet met anyone in person; however, I’d totally be up for a NYC meet-n-greet if anyone lives nearby. I’ve met a few folks who I regularly chat with in each other’s posts and who are very friendly and give sound advice. I’ve listed the 5 with the most comments on my site!

Books, Vertigo and Tea

Rae Longest

IdahoBlueBird50

SUSANDYER1962

Nel at ReactionaryTales

8.) Who originally created the last meme or tag you participated in? Give them a shout out!

I can’t tell! The person who had the original tag isn’t named, and I’ve gone back 5 people to try to track it, but no one knows. If you see this post and it is you, please let us know!

9.) Do you have any social media accounts related to your blog?

Come find me everywhere else!

Twitter     Facebook     Goodreads     Google+     Tumblr     Pinterest     Instagram     LinkedIn        Watching-A-Glass-Shatter        Personal Website

10.) Last but not least… Just give thanks to all of your followers!

Getting 300 WordPress blog followers (excluding people viewing elsewhere, e.g. BlogLovin’, Twitter, etc.) feels great. It’s not as many as some of you have, but it’s growing and I’m loving every minute of it. Thank you for all the likes, shares, follows, votes and ratings. I appreciate it very much. And I’m always open to positive and negative feedback, as well as thoughts on new things to include.

About Me

I’m Jay and I live in NYC. By profession, I work in technology. By passion, I work in writing. Once you hit my site “ThisIsMyTruthNow” at https://thisismytruthnow.com, you can join the fun and see my blog and various site content. You’ll find book reviews, published and in-progress fiction, TV/Film reviews, favorite vacation spots and my own version of the “365 Daily Challenge.” Since March 13, 2017, I’ve posted a characteristic either I currently embody or one I’d like to embody in the future. 365 days of reflection to discover who I am and what I want out of life… see how you compare! Each month, I will post a summary of a trip I’ve taken somewhere in the world. I’ll cover the transportation, hotel, restaurants, activities, who, what, when, where and why… and let you decide for yourself if it’s a trip worth taking.

Feel free to like, rate, comment or take the poll for each post. Tell me what you think. Note: All content is my original creation and copyrighted to me, but the graphics and images were linked from other sites and belong to them. Many thanks to their original creators.