absurd

Book Review: Simple Observations by Patrick Dykie

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A few weeks ago, I saw a post that a blogger I follow, Patrick Dykie, had published a book called Simple Observations: A Humorous Look at the Absurdity of the World Around Us. He’d offered the book via BookGrabbr, a fun new site I am also now following. In his debut, Dykie offers an alphabetical collection of ~25 essays (fun discussions?) basically having a conversation with his readers about various thoughts gallivanting through his head. I thought I’d read a few each night before bed while I was also reading a mystery novel, but after the first few, I found myself unable to put down his book.
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At many points, I had to because my stomach hurt from laughing. At others, I had to so I could contemplate what he’d just told us… on many levels, his observations were completely accurate and eye-opening. On a few others, it was purely just a good laugh. All in all, it’s a fantastic read that will give you a bit of sarcasm, sass, humor, comedy, and eye rolls… we all know people like the one’s he’s described. We’ve all said the same things (a mumble under our breath) when it happens… and on some occasions, he’s probably even talking about something we’ve done ourselves.

Kudos to him for taking his blog writing to another level and sharing a wonderful treasure with us readers! See his blog here.

About Me
For those new to me or my reviews… here’s the scoop: I’m Jay, an author who lives in NYC. My debut novel, Watching Glass Shatter, can be purchased on Amazon. I write A LOT. I read A LOT. And now I blog A LOT. First the book review goes on Goodreads, and then I send it on over to my WordPress blog at https://thisismytruthnow.com, where you’ll find the revealing and introspective 365 Daily Challenge – words and humor. You can also find all my social media profiles to get the details on the who/what/when/where and my pictures. Leave a comment and let me know what you think. Thanks for stopping by. Note: All written content is my original creation and copyrighted to me, but the graphics and images were linked from other sites and belong to them. Many thanks to their original creators.
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Review: Waiting for Godot

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Waiting for GodotBook Review
4 out of 5 stars to Waiting for Godot, written in 1952 by Samuel Beckett. Mankind in general is made up of both passive and active people. In Samuel Beckett’s absurdist play Waiting for Godot, there are four characters who can be directly compared to universal mankind. Estragon and Vladimir are considered passive people because they sit back and let life pass them by, unlike Pozzo and Lucky, who are active people because they live new adventures from day to day. Samuel Beckett’s play is a direct commentary on universal mankind and shows that the world is made up of “couch potatoes” and “Energizer bunnies” who have distinct differences.

Estragon and Vladimir are the passive people and could be considered the “couch potatoes” of today’s world. They sit around and do the same things day-in and day-out. “Couch potatoes” get up, watch TV, sleep, watch TV, eat, and rarely expend any energy. Estragon and Vladimir have daily rituals of removing boots, eating carrots, waiting for Godot, talking of beatings, and forgetting what they did the day before. Both “couch potatoes” and Beckett’s characters do absolutely nothing and as a result, the days run into each other with no boundaries. There is confusion and chaos everywhere. Throughout his play, Samuel Beckett’s characters portray elements of mankind who do nothing and live in a world of inaction and laziness. They are passive like Estragon and Vladimir.

However, Pozzo and Lucky show the active elements of universal mankind. They could be considered the “Energizer bunnies” of today’s world. Lucky runs around, foams at the mouth, recites incomprehensible speeches, and carries his master around subserviently like a true slave. From day to day they visit new places and meet with Estragon and Vladimir in different atmospheres. Pozzo also is very active like an “Energizer bunny.” He, as well as Lucky, “keep on licking and never take a licking.” Together they are constantly on the move from new place to new place. Similar to the real people of the world, Pozzo and Lucky are active. The active people will hop a plane to Paris one day and the next be swimming in Sydney, Australia. They live new adventures daily like Pozzo and Lucky. The characters in Samuel Beckett’s play are directly related to universal mankind who at times can be an active people.



About Me


For those new to me or my reviews… here’s the scoop: I read A LOT. I write A LOT. And now I blog A LOT. First the book review goes on Goodreads, and then I send it on over to my WordPress blog at https://thisismytruthnow.com, where you’ll also find TV & Film reviews, the revealing and introspective 365 Daily Challenge and lots of blogging about places I’ve visited all over the world. And you can find all my social media profiles to get the details on the who/what/when/where and my pictures. Leave a comment and let me know what you think. Vote in the poll and ratings. Thanks for stopping by.

View all my reviews

Review: A Modest Proposal

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A Modest Proposal Book Review
A Modest Proposal is a satirical work of fiction by Jonathan Swift, written nearly 300 years ago. It is an Irish piece, originally published anonymously, but served as a way to shove stupidity in the face of the English government and wealthy. Essentially, in order to solve the problem of poverty, people should eat their children. But it was written in a very serious manner, as though it were meant to be real suggestions. Ahead of its time, it propelled Swift to the forefront of both English literature and the 18th century collection of masterpieces. My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Although not very long (under 50 pages), the language is a bit outdated and requires a few translations to understand what he meant back during that period of time. The humor is undeniable. The time he took to create a solution for every aspect of the problem, as well as provide counter points, is incredibly delicious — pun intended! Though a bit too absurd, even for me, it’s still one of those parts of our English courses we all enjoy reading. It’s hilarious to a 15-year old, who may not know all the different parts of history or the way in which governmental red-tape can work. Find a few pages online after perusing this review… just sample some of the words and phrases he used. It may push you into reading the whole thing!

About Me
For those new to me or my reviews… here’s the scoop: I read A LOT. I write A LOT. And now I blog A LOT. First the book review goes on Goodreads, and then I send it on over to my WordPress blog at https://thisismytruthnow.com, where you’ll also find TV & Film reviews, the revealing and introspective 365 Daily Challenge and lots of blogging about places I’ve visited all over the world. And you can find all my social media profiles to get the details on the who/what/when/where and my pictures. Leave a comment and let me know what you think. Vote in the poll and ratings. Thanks for stopping by. Note: All written content is my original creation and copyrighted to me, but the graphics and images were linked from other sites and belong to them. Many thanks to their original creators.

View all my reviews