apartment

365 Challenge: Day 69 – Mover

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Mover: a person or thing in motion, especially an animal; a person who makes a formal proposal at a meeting or in an assembly

Mover: someone who likes to re-locate a lot, who enjoys the process of packing, unpacking and putting a residence back together

As you can see, I was not a fan of the Interwebs proposed definition of my word for the day: mover. So… it got slashed and I created my own version. Some people love moving from place to place. Others absolutely hate it. I find people are usually in one column or the other, never on middle ground with this one. Curious where I am? You’ll find out soon enough…

When I sat down on the infamous couch (get it: pivot the conversation… and Ross is carrying a couch — I am hilarious!), cup of coffee in hand (albeit too weak because I crashed at 10pm last evening, asking the significant other to make the coffee for the morning, as I meandered down the hall to the bedroom… and he just makes very weak coffee — my fault, I shouldn’t have been lazy), I pondered my disrupted overnight sleep. “Why disrupted?” I hope you asked. Ah, well… a little mood setting first…

We live in NYC in a 3 building complex on East 52nd street between 1st Avenue and the East River, right in between Turtle Bay and Sutton Place. The average age, from what you see when looking around outside or within the building, is at least 65+. I happen to love a very quiet home, and this area usually provides such a comfort. Plus it was less expensive (shockingly!) than the same size place on the West Side, where we previously lived. We are on the top floor of one of the buildings, the 12th, to be precise. We have a huge terrace where Ryder can roam free and enjoy a bit of nature. There are only 3 apartments on the floor, and both our neighbors fly the coop on Thursday evenings, returning on Monday evenings… leaving the entire floor empty — except for us. And access to the rooftop, for the rest of the building, that is…

Around 1am, Ryder began a low growl, growing more and more huffy by the minute. He jumped off the bed, nervously tapping across the wooden floor. I put him back in the bed, slightly annoyed, but then I realized I’d also heard the noise. The other half got up… griping… and then we realized some teenagers had sneaked onto the roof with pizza and beer. {Aside, Ryder’s a better watch or guard dog than I realized!} To cut the story short and get to the part about moving… I have a love / hate relationship with NYC and New York in general. And I seem to want to move in and out of it all the time.

I was born in Florida (parents were on a 2-year hiatus from NY where the family’s been for almost 200 years) but I grew up from the age of 2 until 18 on Long Island in NY. I temporarily lived in Pennsylvania during my college years, until 22, then I was back in my hometown for a year. I basically lived in 1 place for the first 20 years of my life. And since then, I’ve moved every 2 to 3 years, constantly switching back and forth from wanting to live in an urban or city environment (Brooklyn, Manhattan, San Francisco) or the true suburbs (Pennsylvania, Long Island). I’ve bought and sold several houses and city apartments, always searching for the opposite of what I have — roughly every couple of years.

Through it all, I love the art of moving. To pull everything off the wall, out of the closets or down from storage… To decide what to keep, donate or trash… To re-pack… You may think this a little crazy, but in all… ten times (I counted it)… I’ve moved… I had the new place setup within 2 days — usually over the course of a weekend. Of course, not absolutely everything. Sometimes you need new furniture or more stuff for the walls. But all the clothes, bathroom items, kitchen stuff, living room / den areas… all the stuff you need to be comfortable while you sort out how to turn it into your new home.

I love that process. Organizing the boxes. Choosing where to set up the staging areas. Deciding what order to follow. Cleaning the room before starting any work in it. It must be an illness… as from what I can tell, less than 10% of us are like this, when it comes to moving. Most people I know are vehemently against it; they won’t move unless forced to move. Not me… except for the expense of the moving supplies and transportation, and the costs for closing on real estate or deposits, I’d do it every single year.

We’ve been in this apartment for 2.5 years. Guess what’s going on in my mind right now, as I sit on the couch with my third cup of coffee… still not awake… yup, it’s time to move. But at least I’m not the only one thinking it, meaning I may not have an uphill climb to consider the next place to call home. And that sounds like a good topic for a 365 post next week: where do I move to next!

How about you?  Any other movers out there? Or am I alone in this weird addiction?

About Me & the “365 Daily Challenge”

I’m Jay and I live in NYC. By profession, I work in technology. By passion, I work in writing. I’ve always been a reader. And now I’m a daily blogger. I decided to start my own version of the “365 Daily Challenge” where since March 13, 2017, I’ve posted a characteristic either I currently embody or one I’d like to embody in the future. 365 days of reflection to discover who I am and what I want out of life.

The goal: Knowledge. Acceptance. Understanding. Optimization. Happiness. Help. For myself. For others. And if all else fails, humor. When I’m finished in one year, I hope to have more answers about the future and what I will do with the remainder of my life. All aspects to be considered. It’s not just about a career, hobbies, residence, activities, efforts, et al. It’s meant to be a comprehensive study and reflection from an ordinary man. Not a doctor. Not a therapist. Not a friend. Not an encyclopedia full of prior research. Just pure thought, a blogged journal with true honesty.

Join the fun and read a new post each day, or check out my book reviews, TV/Film reviews or favorite vacation spots. And feel free to like, rate, comment or take the poll for each post. Note: All written content is my original creation and copyrighted to me, but the graphics and images were linked from other sites and belong to them. Many thanks to their original creators.

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365 Challenge: Day 45 – Neighborly

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Neighborly: being good neighbor [person who lives close by to you], especially helpful, friendly, or kind

Being neighborly can be a good and a bad thing. As I begin writing this post, I’m smack in the middle of the barometer on the whole subject. Let’s see where I end up at the bottom of this post.

Seems like an easy one, right? You’re nice to the people who live next door to you. But how far do you actually take it? Do you become friends? Do you dog-sit? Do you lend items? Do you stalk? Oh, wait, that’s taking it too far.

I’m proud to say I’ve never had a combative relationship with any of my neighbors. I’ve had a few times where they bothered me a little bit with excess noise or a sour puss… but those things can be ignored or fixed with a minor conversation. Except for once. One neighbor always looked like she was miserable… and trying to be a nicer person, I said “hi, how was your day?” in the elevator. She looked at me, pulled her glasses down towards the end of her nose, smirked and said “There’s no need for us to talk.” I had never spoken to the woman before. Our apartments don’t share a common wall. And I’m extremely quiet, so I couldn’t have bothered her before.  A few days later, a friend stopped by, and we all got stuck in the elevator together riding down a few floors. I admit it was childish… but when the woman stepped out of the elevator before us, I mumbled just loud enough for her to hear… “Shh… talking will send you straight to hell around here.”  Ah, that’s on my board of “Moments I am Proud of.”

Historically speaking… your neighbors were people you were often very close to, related to, or at least knew enough about. Nearly 100 years ago, it was acceptable for your neighbor to complete the US Census for you when the census taker couldn’t get hold of you. And when the cops came around looking for you, your neighbor always knew where you’d be!

Today, people sometimes live in an apartment building for years, never once seeing or meeting their next door neighbor. When I lived in the suburbs, I thought that was completely nuts. How could you not see the person every day? Then I moved into the city and realized… it’s definitely possible.

As a child and teenager, I lived next door in the suburbs to my best friend. We were the same age, went to school together and played or hung out every day after school and on weekends. Everyone on the block knew one another… until slowly generations changed and people moved… then folks started talking about that new couple that moved in… and the nosy gossip started!

When I lived in the dorms in college, I knew my mates and the 2 or 3 dorm room inhabitants directly around me, but not everyone. And when I bought my first house, I made zero effort to get to know the people who lived nearby. So where do I fall on that neighborly scale?

Reasons Why I Am

  • I love small town charm and knowing everyone else’s business. But they can’t know mine.
  • I love being helpful in case (s)he needs to borrow a cup of sugar.
  • I kinda want to know if someone creepy is living that close to try not to get on his/her bad side.
  • It’s probably good someone knows what you look like in case someone else is trying to break into your place. At least there’s a chance (s)he will try to call the cops for you.

Reasons Why I Am NOT

  • I live in NYC where everything is a rush. Who has time for chit-chat?
  • I’m a shy and quiet person. I don’t like to be interrupted.
  • I tend to get a little “that’s mine, don’t touch it” attitude every so often. I was an only child. And I don’t like border disputes! 🙂

In all seriousness though… being neighborly seems like a good thing. It can run the gamut from friendly to just a nod of acceptance. We’re all in this world together, a little gesture now and again shouldn’t kill us. And you never know who or what may come out of getting to know them a little bit.

I also think it’s a different type of neighborly when you live in the same building versus separate land and property. It’s easy to chat in an elevator with someone who lives on your floor. (REALLY, it is…) You may need to make the effort when they live 100 feet away.

How about you? Do you want to know your neighbors or would you prefer to keep some distance?

About Me & the “365 Daily Challenge”

I’m Jay. I am 40 and live in NYC. By profession, I work in technology. By passion, I work in writing. I’ve always been a reader. And now I’m a daily blogger. I decided to start my own version of the “365 Daily Challenge” where since March 13, 2017, I’ve posted a characteristic either I currently embody or one I’d like to embody in the future. 365 days of reflection to discover who I am and what I want out of life.

The goal: Knowledge. Acceptance. Understanding. Optimization. Happiness. Help. For myself. For others. And if all else fails, humor. When I’m finished in one year, I hope to have more answers about the future and what I will do with the remainder of my life. All aspects to be considered. It’s not just about a career, hobbies, residence, activities, efforts, et al. It’s meant to be a comprehensive study and reflection from an ordinary man. Not a doctor. Not a therapist. Not a friend. Not an encyclopedia full of prior research. Just pure thought, a blogged journal with true honesty.

Join the fun and read a new post each day, or check out my book reviews, TV/Film reviews or favorite vacation spots. And feel free to like, rate, comment or take the poll for each post. Note: All written content is my original creation and copyrighted to me, but the graphics and images were linked from other sites and belong to them. Many thanks to their original creators.