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TAG: Fight Like a YA Girl

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Thank you so much Patty @ Moohnshine’s Corner for tagging me on this cool tag. It’s the most difficult one I’ve ever done… and she’s gonna pay for it one day. Possibly with a cake… Hahaha! So fair…

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The Rules:

  • Thank the person who tagged you.
  • Mention the creator Krysti at YA and Wine
  • Match at least one YA girl with each of the themes below.
  • Tag as many people as you like!

 

1.WARRIOR GIRLS:

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2. GIRLS WHO FIGHT WITH THEIR MIND:

  • Hermione from Harry Potter. She always knows the right spell to deal with the enemy.

hrmione.jpg

 

3. GIRLS WHO FIGHT WITH THEIR HEART:

  • Lou from Me Before You. At first glance, it may not appear that she does, but in the end, her heart brought her back to him and tried to convince Will to change his mind. She may or may not be a young adult, but in my mind, she was young enough.

mebeforeyou

4. GIRLS WHO ARE TRAINED FIGHTERS:

 katniess.jpg

5. STRONG GIRLS OF COLOR:

  • Rue from The Hunger Games. She stayed in the game for a long time.

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6. GIRLS WHO FIGHT TO SURVIVE:

  • Lisbeth Salander from The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo. She will never die.

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7. GIRLS WHO ARE WEAPONS MASTERS:

 

*** See anyone from The Hunger Games ***

8. GIRLS WHO DON’T CONFORM TO GENDER ROLES:

 

*** See several from The Hunger Games ***

9. GIRLS WITH KICK-BUTT MAGICAL POWERS:

  • Lyra from The Golden Compass. Imagine what Lyra can do with the alethiometer.

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10. STRONG GIRLS IN CONTEMPORARY NOVELS:

  •  Pretty Little Liars

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11. SERIOUSLY FIERCE GIRLS:

*** See anyone from The Hunger Games ***

12. MOST ANTICIPATED BOOK WITH A STRONG LEADING LADY:

 

  • WOW!!! Too many to come up with,  but none are Young Adult. I’m gonna have to think about this one… suggestions?

Nominations To Do This Tag

 

About Me

I’m Jay and I live in NYC. By profession, I work in technology. By passion, I work in writing. I’ve always been a reader. And now I’m a daily blogger. I decided to start my own version of the “365 Daily Challenge” where since March 13, 2017, I’ve posted a characteristic either I currently embody or one I’d like to embody in the future. 365 days of reflection to discover who I am and what I want out of life.

The goal: Knowledge. Acceptance. Understanding. Optimization. Happiness. Help. For myself. For others. And if all else fails, humor. When I’m finished in one year, I hope to have more answers about the future and what I will do with the remainder of my life. All aspects to be considered. It’s not just about a career, hobbies, residence, activities, efforts, et al. It’s meant to be a comprehensive study and reflection from an ordinary man. Not a doctor. Not a therapist. Not a friend. Not an encyclopedia full of prior research. Just pure thought, a blogged journal with true honesty.

Join the fun and read a new post each day, or check out my book reviews, TV/Film reviews or favorite vacation spots. And feel free to like, rate, comment or take the poll for each post. Note: All written content is my original creation and copyrighted to me, but the graphics and images were linked from other sites and belong to them. Many thanks to their original creators.

Review: Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire

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Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire Book Review
4+ of 5 stars to Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, the 4th book in the “Harry Potter” young adult fantasy series, written in 2000 by J.K. Rowling. Although this one was close to a 5 for me, I think it’s enough to give 1 book in the series a 5-rating, which means this one will stay at a 4. But I still loved and adored the characters, the setting, the story, the themes… all of it! Rather than go into a detailed review, as we’ve seen too many of them (always fun to read tho!), I’m just going to chat a little bit about the parts that I enjoyed the most.

1. The selection of the 3 students to participate in the Tri-Wizard Tournament. It’s scary to think the schools condone putting the kids at such risk, but then again, I suppose they’d stop it just before anyone died or was hurt irreparably. To imagine the goblet of fire choosing one from each school, and then Harry’s name being cast as a fourth one… fantastic idea and approach. I felt the drama. And I loved having him put to the test mid-way thru the series… as he never seemed to be all that good of a student or a wizard!

2. The introduction of new characters in this one is intense. I loved all the folks at the various stages of the competition. To see feelings emerge for one another, to know they were going thru the same unrequited love and anger we all go through as teenagers. Was a good experience — I thought it was one of the more real aspects of the series.

3. The imagination for all the tournaments and the dance… fantastic. I wanted to be there watching it all happen. I can only imagine how it felt to write those scenes… knowing it would propel the characters forward in a very different path by the end. And to see the drama of how it all turns out.

I am feeling the need to re-read this series again soon…

About Me
For those new to me or my reviews… here’s the scoop: I read A LOT. I write A LOT. And now I blog A LOT. First the book review goes on Goodreads, and then I send it on over to my WordPress blog at https://thisismytruthnow.com, where you’ll also find TV & Film reviews, the revealing and introspective 365 Daily Challenge and lots of blogging about places I’ve visited all over the world. And you can find all my social media profiles to get the details on the who/what/when/where and my pictures. Leave a comment and let me know what you think. Vote in the poll and ratings. Thanks for stopping by. Note: All written content is my original creation and copyrighted to me, but the graphics and images were linked from other sites and belong to them. Many thanks to their original creators.

View all my reviews

Review: Petals on the Wind

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Petals on the WindBook Review
4 of 5 stars to Petals on the Wind, the 2nd novel in the “Dollanganger” series written in 1980 by V.C. Andrews. It all started with the attic in the first book, but it set a series of event that would have disastrous impacts for years to come. When you finished the first book, you thought there couldn’t be anything more shocking in this family than two cousins falling in love and having children. You also thought there couldn’t be a meaner mother or grandmother. But then… book two takes it all that much further. Now, two of the children, brother and sister, fall in love and have an intimate relationship. But it doesn’t stop there… this family is full of insanity. There are so many crazy story lines between each of these people, you never quite know where it will go. VC Andrews excels at creating family drama. And I fell for it. Though Flowers in the Attic, the first in the series, is first in my heart… this was a fairly close second and follow-up book in the series. You’ll still be hooked… and wonder how the kids will get revenge. Keep with the series at this point. It’s definitely worth seeing the impact they attic had on the Dollanganger kids.

About Me
For those new to me or my reviews… here’s the scoop: I read A LOT. I write A LOT. And now I blog A LOT. First the book review goes on Goodreads, and then I send it on over to my WordPress blog at https://thisismytruthnow.com, where you’ll also find TV & Film reviews, the revealing and introspective 365 Daily Challenge and lots of blogging about places I’ve visited all over the world. And you can find all my social media profiles to get the details on the who/what/when/where and my pictures. Leave a comment and let me know what you think. Vote in the poll and ratings. Thanks for stopping by. Note: All written content is my original creation and copyrighted to me, but the graphics and images were linked from other sites and belong to them. Many thanks to their original creators.

View all my reviews

Review: Black Beauty

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Black Beauty Review
Black Beauty by Anna Sewell is a beautiful story meant for older children or very young adults. It was written in the 19th century by a woman who passed away shortly after its publication. I enjoyed the story and have given it a 3 of 5 stars, which is still very good in my book. A few interesting things:

1. The point of view in the book is from Black Beauty, the horse.
2. It takes place in London nearly 150 years ago.
3. It’s still a cherished story for both pleasure reading and education purposes.

I received it as a gift when I was about 8 or 9, as I had asked for several “classics” for Christmas. When I saw the cover, I thought it looked pretty. But not enough to read it. It sat on my shelf for probably two years until one day, I said “let’s just give it a chance.” I was afraid it would be too boring… I’ve always preferred complex plots and strong characters. I wasn’t sure this would really work for me. I was wrong!

Seeing how people mistreated and misunderstood animals was a big benefit of the book. It opens your eyes to things from another perspective, and if it helps just a little to develop a bond between younger adults / children and animals, then it’s served its purpose.

It’s one of those books everyone should read… but not as a forced school assignment. It should be something parents want to share with their kids around 7 or 8… teaching them about how to be respectful and kind to all creatures. And then take them horseback riding to see what it’s actually like. That’s what I did when I finished it… went with a small group of friends to a riding academy / farm a few towns over and learned about horses for one summer. I kinda miss riding… maybe I should try it again. Off topic again… what is up with me today on these reviews! 🙂

About Me
For those new to me or my reviews… here’s the scoop: I read A LOT. I write A LOT. And now I blog A LOT. First the book review goes on Goodreads, and then I send it on over to my WordPress blog at https://thisismytruthnow.com, where you’ll also find TV & Film reviews, the revealing and introspective 365 Daily Challenge and lots of blogging about places I’ve visited all over the world. And you can find all my social media profiles to get the details on the who/what/when/where and my pictures. Leave a comment and let me know what you think. Vote in the poll and ratings. Thanks for stopping by. Note: All written content is my original creation and copyrighted to me, but the graphics and images were linked from other sites and belong to them. Many thanks to their original creators.

View all my reviews

Review: Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban

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Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban
Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban by J.K. Rowling

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

“OMG — Not another book review on Harry Potter.” *or* “OMG — I LOVE HARRY POTTER”

I bet you just said something along those lines… Me too. But I have to do this for two reasons: (1) It’s Harry Potter and (2) I committed to writing a real review for every book I’ve read and I’m only on 202 of 454. Slap me please. But when I’m done, not quite yet.

However, to save us both… I won’t do a review on this whole book. You can read every other review for that! I’ll just say the top 5 reasons why I loved this particular book:

1. Harry Potter went dark! Not the book… the character… this was the first time for me where I really stood back and said “He’s growing up. He’s realizing not everything around him should be believed without a hint of doubt.” When he protected Sirius in the Shrieking Shack, it all changed for me.

2. Dementors are awesome. I love the concept of stealing someone’s soul through sucking their physical body off its bones.

3. Transfiguration is a focus point, and I love seeing people turn into animals. It’s like our core is bursting to show itself.

4. Remus was my favorite Defense Against the Dark Arts professor. He was someone I’d want to hang out with… you know, and be a werewolf and all.

5. History is revealed in many family connections and secrets. And since that’s my favorite thing… this book was the most eye-opening for me.

See, that wasn’t so bad to re-read a little bit of Harry Potter. I promise the next one won’t be so hard. Only 4 left to write a review for.

About Me
For those new to me or my reviews… here’s the scoop: I read A LOT. I write A LOT. And now I blog A LOT. First the book review goes on Goodreads, and then I send it on over to my WordPress blog at https://thisismytruthnow.com, where you’ll also find TV & Film reviews, the revealing and introspective 365 Daily Challenge and lots of blogging about places I’ve visited all over the world. And you can find all my social media profiles to get the details on the who/what/when/where and my pictures. Leave a comment and let me know what you think. Vote in the poll and ratings. Thanks for stopping by.


View all my reviews

Review: Alice in Wonderland

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Alice in Wonderland
Alice in Wonderland written by Lewis Carroll and adapted by Jane Carruth

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Lewis Carroll‘s Alice in Wonderland is one we are all familiar with at some point in our lives. Many of us have read an abridged version, heard the basics of the tale from friends or family, or even watched cartoon versions. And when Johnny Depp’s version was filmed, everyone flocked to re-read the book. I actually read the story when I was about 13 or 14, as I had gotten a set of various classics for my Confirmation from a close family member.

Alice is a remarkable character. She can be a completely charming and funny girl, and she can be an example of life lessons. It’s the kind of book where you have a lot of interpretations, especially given what your particular reading style is. You may feel close to the Mad Hatter, the Queen or Alice herself. Perhaps it’s the caterpillar or Cheshire cat or the rabbit. Each character represents many things in our life, and each temptation is something Alice, or any young child, must consider. But it’s also just a beautifully drawn and illustrated tale of friendship and going on a journey in unexpected places.

It’s a must for for kids and again as adults. There’s a strong chance you will get something different between reads. I also suggest a first time reader NOT read it alone. It’s not anything bad, but it’s the kind of book worth talking about… that you want to share your thoughts on… it will build your analytical skills… and it’s a perfect way for parents and kids to connect about the right way to do things and the consequences of one’s actions. I’d say around 10 or 11 is the best age… but all depends on the maturity level of everyone involved.

Think about the imagination and creativity that went into designing the world that Alice finds in the hole… I wonder what gave all these ideas to Carroll. Lots of speculation, but in the end, I choose to forget what led to the creation and rather to simply enjoy the fantasy world created for me.

And who doesn’t love talking animals?

About Me
For those new to me or my reviews… here’s the scoop: I read A LOT. I write A LOT. And now I blog A LOT. First the book review goes on Goodreads, and then I send it on over to my WordPress blog at https://thisismytruthnow.com, where you’ll also find TV & Film reviews, the revealing and introspective 365 Daily Challenge and lots of blogging about places I’ve visited all over the world. And you can find all my social media profiles to get the details on the who/what/when/where and my pictures. Leave a comment and let me know what you think. Vote in the poll and ratings. Thanks for stopping by.


View all my reviews

Review: The Witches

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The Witches
The Witches by Roald Dahl

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Roald Dahl is in my top 3 of favorite children’s authors. I had read a few of his books as a child, but most of my exposure occurred as a young adult and while in college.

The Witches was actually a book I read after the movie with Anjelica Huston was produced. I am a huge fan of her work, and when she appeared in this movie, I was fascinated with the story. I’d definitely recommend reading the book first as the movie takes the story so much further.

For one thing, the book has an unnamed narrator and grandmother, whereas the movie is very detailed on the history of the characters, the various types of relationships, etc. But both were still very good.

It combines so many wonderful things for kids to love — and to be scared of. Witches who can turn little boys into… well, I won’t ruin the surprise. Suffice it to say, this can be a bit of a scary theme.

Dahl’s style is so embracing and captivating. His characters are intense. The creativity and imagination from the works he’s produced over the years is quite astonishing.

The Grand High Witch runs the show here, and she won’t let you forget it. But it’s the grandmother and the boy who may hold all the power. A classic battle of good and evil with some fun thrown in between.

A definite read for kids. And adults. When I was taking a course in college on “Reading in the Elementary School,” I had to read 150 children’s books and produce a portfolio showing a lesson plan for each book. Dahl featured in many of the lessons and books I had chosen, as I tried to incorporate some Newbery and Caldecott winners, but not all. What a joy to re-read these classics as a 21 year old thinking about becoming a teacher. Though I didn’t stay in the teaching field (and possibly regret it to some degree), I will always go back to these books and this time period as one of the favorite parts of life.

About Me

For those new to me or my reviews… here’s the scoop: I read A LOT. I write A LOT. And now I blog A LOT. First the book review goes on Goodreads, and then I send it on over to my WordPress blog at https://thisismytruthnow.com, where you’ll also find TV & Film reviews, the revealing and introspective 365 Daily Challenge and lots of blogging about places I’ve visited all over the world. And you can find all my social media profiles to get the details on the who/what/when/where and my pictures. Leave a comment and let me know what you think. Vote in the poll and ratings. Thanks for stopping by.

View all my reviews